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Bitcoin Fullnode Install Guide for Dummies ;-)

Bitcoin Fullnode Install Guide for Dummies ;-)
Feel free to stop at Level 0 or Level 1, which is fine. More advanced configs are offered to those with more tech savvy. This guide, obviously assumes a Windows 10 install, but other OSes work fine, just find a different guide. BTW, the "For Dummies" is a callback to a set of "tech" books in the 90's intended to be as easy as possible. It is in jest and not intended to insult the reader. Finally, if you dislike the formatting, a well formatted copy can be found here
There is a fairly small subset of Bitcoin users that run a full node. I think the idea of running a full node has gotten a bad rap over the years since there is so much talk about running on a Raspberry Pi, or getting zippy SSDs. Although all of this can be fun, it is often not really required at all. Here are some ways to run a full node starting with the very simple. I'll get into more complex configs, but these are all optional.

Tech Skill Level: 0 (the basics)

  1. Download Bitcoin Core
  2. Launch the downloaded installer and install the app
  3. Launch the installed "Bitcoin Core" app and let it run overnight
In many cases, thats it. If your running a new machine with a fairly good internet connection, 8 or 9 hours will be enough to complete the "Initial Block Download" (IBD). This may fill up your drive a bit, but again, on most new machines, 300 GB of space isn't that hard to come by.

Tech Skill Level: 1 (encrypted wallet)

One thing we left out in the level-0 exercise is encrypting your wallet. It's easy enough to do well, but a bit more difficult to do right. The main challenge is that humans generate really poor passwords. If you want a good password, the best way is to use something called "diceware". Basically, you just grab 4 or 5 dice and each throw of the dice represents a certain word on a special list. The throw {1,4,5,3,1} for example would be the word camping on the EFF-diceware-wordlist. So you repeat this a few times until you have a list of 8 or so words which becomes the passphrase you use to encrypt your wallet. Write it down, it is always hard to remember at first. So at level-1 your list becomes:
  1. Download Bitcoin Core
  2. Launch the downloaded installer and install the app
  3. Launch the installed "Bitcoin Core" app and let it run overnight
  4. Choose Encrypt Wallet from the Settings menu
  5. Enter your 8 word (or so) passphrase generated using the Diceware method

Wallet Encryption Dialog

Tech Skill Level: 2 (enable pruning if needed)

Though I said "300 GB of space isn't hard to come by", some times it actually is. If space is an issue, a simple way to fix it is to tell bitcoin to simple take less space. This is called "pruning" and can take that number from 300 GB down to below 5 GB. If you can't find 5 GB, then you'll have to read ahead to level-4 to add USB storage. But the good news is, enabling pruning is pretty easy, we just add another step to our working list:
  1. Download Bitcoin Core
  2. Launch the downloaded installer and install the app
  3. Launch the installed "Bitcoin Core" app and let it run overnight
  4. Do the wallet encryption steps here if you wish
  5. Choose Options from the Settings menu
  6. Choose Prune block storage to: and select the max size for the blocks to use
  7. Exit and restart the bitcoin application for the changes to take effect

Pruning Dialog
Note, even setting this to 1 GB will still leave you with about a 4.5 GB install. The blocks take up a lot of space, but the chainstate and other folders eat up at least 3.5 GB and they can't be pruned. Also, be aware, to disable pruning requires you to perform the entire IBD again. While pruned some other functions my be disabled as well, so just know that pruning does limit some functionality.

Tech Skill Level: 3 (verify the installer)

Although this is arguably something that should be done at level-0, some find the intricacies of comparing hash (thumbprint) values to be tedious and beyond the scope of a beginner. You will find these types of hash compares suggested quite often as a way to prevent running tainted programs. Programs are often tainted by bad disk or network performance, but most often, taint is malicious code inserted by viruses or malware. This is a way to guard yourself against those types of attacks.
What I cover here is a very basic comparison on the certificate, but a more thorough verification advised by mosts uses a program called Gpg4Win, and is beyond the scope of this beginners guide. But regardless, most users should strive to do this minimum level of validation.
  1. Download Bitcoin Core
  2. Launch the downloaded installer
  3. When prompted "Do you want to allow..." click Show more details
  4. In the details section select Show information about the publisher's certificate
  5. In the certificate window select the Details tab
  6. In the Details tab Subject should start with "CN = Bitcoin Core Code Signing Association"
  7. Ensure Thumbprint in Details reads ea27d3cefb3eb715ed214176a5d027e01ba1ee86
  8. If the checks pass, click OK to exit the certificate window and Yes to allow the installer to run.
  9. Launch the installed "Bitcoin Core" app and let it run overnight
  10. Do the wallet encryption steps here if you wish
  11. Do the optional pruning steps here if you wish

Certification Validation Windows
Note: The certificate used to sign the current Bitcoin installer is only valid from March 2020 to March 2021. After that point the thumbprint on the certificate will change. This is by design and intentional. If your reading this post after March 2021, then it is understood that the thumbprint has changed.

Tech Skill Level: 4 (use secondary storage)

We glossed over the "new machine with fairly good internet" part. Truth be known many people do not have fairly new machines, and find the IBD to take longer than the "over night" best wishes. For most people the slowdown is the disk access when calculating what is called chainstate. This requires fast random reads and writes to the disk. If you have an SSD disk, this will be no problem, but if you have a non-SSD "spinning" disk, random writes are always slow. Though an SSD will speed things up, they are pricey, so a nice middle ground may be a simple high-end USB key drive. You can get some with 10 to 15 MB/s random writes for $20 on Amazon. This is usually a order of magnitude faster than a "spinning" disk. And with pruning (see level-2), a small USB drive should be fine.
Once you decide on a drive, the tricky part will be to enable external storage. It requires editing a configuration file and adding a line. First, we want to create a directory on the key drive. You will need to determine the drive letter of your USB key drive. For the sake of this example, we will assume it is D:, but you must determine this yourself and correct the example. Once you know the drive letter, create a blank folder on the drive called Bitcoin. So for this example, creating Bitcoin on drive D: will create the path D:\Bitcoin. Once done, assuming that D: is your drive, here are the new steps including the edit of the configuration file:
  1. Download Bitcoin Core
  2. Launch the installer, verify it, then run it
  3. Launch the installed "Bitcoin Core" app and let it run overnight
  4. Do the wallet encryption steps here if you wish
  5. Do the optional pruning steps here if you wish
  6. Launch "Notepad" by typing "Notepad.exe" in the windows search bar then click Open
  7. Type the line datadir=D:\Bitcoin (depending on your drive letter) in the blank file
  8. Choose Save from the File menu in notepad
  9. Type %APPDATA%\Bitcoin\bitcoin.conf (note the percent signs) in the File name box
  10. Select All Files from the Save as type dropdown
  11. Click the Save button and overwrite the file if prompted
  12. Exit and restart the bitcoin application for the changes to take effect

Save As Dialog
Now that you've reached this level of technical expertise, there are many new configuration options that you can begin to modify if you wish. Most configuration data is contained in the bitcoin.conf file and learning how to maintain it is a key step for a node operator.

Tech Skill Level: 5 (all other customizations)

Here's a short list of various things you can ADD to your bitcoin.conf file. You generally just add a new line for each configuration settings.
  • addresstype=bech32
  • changetype=bech32
The addresstype / changetype allows your wallet to use the native-segwit (bech32) format. This is the most efficient and inexpensive way to spend bitcoin, and is a recommended configuration. The default uses something called p2sh-segwit which is more compatible with older wallets, but more expensive to spend.
  • minrelaytxfee=0.00000011
Changing the minrelaytxfee setting allows you to help propagate lower fee transactions. It will require more memory but TXN memory is capped at 300 MB by default anyways, so if you have enough memory, it is a good setting to choose.
  • dbcache=2048
The dbcache setting controls how many MB of memory the program will use for the chainstate database. Since this is a key bottleneck in the IBD, setting this value high (2048 MB) will greatly speed up the IBD, assuming you have the memory to spare
  • blocksdir=C:\Bitcoin
  • datadir=D:\Bitcoin
In level-4 we discussed moving the datadir to a fast external storage, but the majority of the space used for bitcoin is the blocks directory (blocksdir). Although you should always use for fastest storage for datadir, you are free to use slow storage for blocksdir. So if you only want to consume a small amount of your SSD (assumed D:) then you can keep your blocks on your slow "spinning" drive.
  • upnp=1
One of the harder challenges you may face running a node, is to get incoming connections. If you are lucky, you may find that your firewall and network HW support the uPnP protocol. If they do, this setting will allow bitcoin to configure uPnP to allow incoming connections to your node. Other methods exist to make your node reachable, but they are well beyond the scope of this guide.
submitted by brianddk to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Everyday info sec, hardcore info sec, and DNMs

Edit: Currently writing a new version of this, dont know when it will be done.
Edit: Since first post I have updated a few sections with additional information.
I recommend reading it all even if it is very long, I might have placed some relevant info in different sections while thinking about what else needed to be added, plenty of steps remains mostly the same except when I comment directly on it. It is not necessary to do 100% security all the time, unless you absolutely need it, combining some high and some lower security ideas for a balance of security and convenience is useful.
I will base this mostly on Windows, Linux users probably know this, and I have no idea how apple machines work (tho many things in here are still relevant for other operating systems, as they are just general tips)
Disclaimer: There are certainly other steps that can make you more anonymous or safer, however I think for most people this will surfice. Any software I recommend should be independently verified for security, and examples of software are not to be taken as endorsements. I simply use examples and give recommendations when I believe it necessary, or helpful.
I will not really differentiate between anonymity and security, they are often the same thing. As such the word security can mean either more anonymous, less vulnerable, or both.
--------
Everyday Simple Info Sec:
-There could be a hidden administrator user on your PC, make sure to change its password
(Snapchat msgs, reddit dms, discord msgs, are just a few examples of msgs that are never encrypted)
-Any info even send in encrypted msgs (and obviously non encrypted) should still be kept with possible deniability, don't say "I'm gonna do MDMA", say "I'm going out with molly."
-DO NOT STORE ANY PASSWORDS ON GOOGLE, IF GOOGLE LOGIN IS AUTHENTICATED IT WILL AUTFILL ALL PASSWORDS IT HAS SAVED (same with other similar services) (This means if you are logged in to chrome and someone has access to your machine, they can auto fill passwords without entering a single password)
-use a rememberable passphrase, especially for your master key ring aka password manager A long sentence that is memorable makes an okay password (decent example,: "I met my wife at Little Ceasers for the first time on 07/09/20" better even if it's just something you know, if its impersonal, and if you can add special characters or numbers that you won't forget) (A better example for a passphrase is: "There is 0nly 0ne letter that d0esn’t appear in any U.S. state nameQ")
-Purge your internet activity frequently, there's a reason why I only have one post, and a few comments appearing in my account, but thousands of kama. Exposing information needlessly is not good.
-Never post private information publicly, and if you do, do it vaguely as possible. (Example: Not "I'm 15", say "I'm a teenager") Do not post any vital information ever, no birthdays, mother's maiden name, age, or anything you have ever seen in a security question. Never post your current activities while they are ongoing. You going on a vacation? Don't announce it to the world, taking picture there? Post them when you are home.
-Rethink how you do security questions. Many answers to security questions can be found in your internet history. One could use the first word of the security question as an answer, or a different sceme that will mean you always remember it. (Security question need to go, the amount of personal info an average person puts on the internet makes it easy to attack anything using security question)
-------_
High level crimimal information security:
The motto here is, "All the Security, All the Time" As one fuck up can end with you leaving a lick of traceability, and you could be fucked.
Pre Note: All of your software should always be up to date. Also even perfect info sec does not guarantee you are completely safe, a new zero day (exploit) can still fuck you, but good info security makes you significantly safer, by eliminating as many attacks as possible.
-Get a new device (or make a already owned device seem like you never owned it, do this only if you know how to, there's a lot of stuff that goes into that, like changing your mac adress etc) buy with cash, and your face covered, preferably far away from where you live. (Do I need to specify to not bring your phone or anything else that tracks your location to anywhere you want to go anonymously?) (Be aware that even hardware can have vulnerabilities, many cpus have known vulnerabilities, I can't list them all, do some research before buying)
-If you know how to use Tails (A linux distro designed for Info sec) use that, preferably on a USB. (Or learn how to use tails, its better, but complicated) Otherwise a clean copy of windows (make sure its not in any way associated with you) can do the job too, tho not as well. (Using a VM might give extra security, since VMs usually erase all data and RAM they were using on shutdown)
-Get a non tracking VPN, Enable the kill switch (a setting that disables all traffic that doesn't go through the VPN) (change your firewall settings to only allow the traffic from the VPN, windows guide (Change settings so only traffic from the tor application is send) Edit: (Due to complaints: do not use vpn over tor, use tor over vpn. tor over vpn has no notable downside, if the VPN logs it makes no difference, your ISP will always log anyways, and vpns remove other attack vectors and also provide backup security should tor fail. Again even if the VPN tracks you only change the people doing the tracking, but now you are further removed making it more anonymous and also with less vulnerabilities)
-rember privacy settings, cookie cleaner, and antivirus, password (There could be a hidden administrator user on your PC, make sure to change its password)
-Always use the device on a non admin account
-Ideally use this device only on networks that are not connected with you. Such as public networks (try to never use the same public networks twice, move around) (a home network should be fine now, as it should never be exposed, but more security is always better) (Its just a conveniences vs security trade)
-Never use accounts that have been exposed to lower security on higher security machines
-your browser is now TOR (or your preferred security focused browser, if you dont plan on using onion ) Make sure you get the standalone version of tor not the addon build (the standalone is safer, because there are less settings and options to tweak)
-Change your tor settings, to safest mode, enable a bridge (to my knowledge there's no difference in security between the build in bridges in tor), enable automatic updates, set duckduckgo onion as your primary browser. Set dark.fail onion page as your home page. (Or your preferred privacy search engine and onion directory)
-------_
How to use dark net markets (DNMs)
If you finished your High Security setup, we can dive right in. Otherwise go do that. This is where all that is essential.
Quick info on Tor, and onion sites. There is no search engine. It's all based of directories and addresses you are given by others. Tor will likely not be very quick, it has to pass through multiple networks to get to the destination. DNMs sometimes exit scam, an exit scam is when a market shuts down completely and takes all the money, this is a risk when using DNMs, it's not too common but happens maybe 0-4 times a year. The admins of thoese servers need to get out at some point, before they get jailed, so they exit the game, and scam everyone out of their money.
-A very useful onion directory is dark.fail it has a lot of links, for all kinds of stuff. News, email, DNMs, Psychonautwiki (harm reduction website), forums etc. (Other directories also exist)
-Pick a market, preferably one that handles secure connection server side instead of requiring you to establish the secure connection. Then create an account. Your account once created should include an entry box in your profile for a pgp key, post your PUBLIC key in there. (Verify the link is not a scam, most markets should provide a pgp signature)
-Next is currency setup. All major cryptocurrency exchangers can be used, I can recommend coin base but there could be better ones out there. Unless you find a small non U.S., exchange, they will always ask for your identity. So unless you can find a trustworthy exchange that doesn't ID, you will need to give it to them. (Side note, all major crypto exchangers report to the IRS, if the IRS asks you if you bought cryptocurrency and you bought while having IDed yourself SAY YES, DO NOT COMMIT TAX FRAUD WHEN THEY KNOW YOU DID)
-Transfer (monero you can send directly, btc you should scramble) to your wallet. There are two options a cold wallet (physical) or a software wallet. Software wallets usually dont cost anything so I recommend them, even if often less safe. Electrum is easy to use, and pretty safe. You can also do your own research and find a wallet that fits your needs.
-now you are ready to buy, only buy using escrow (it means the money is held by the market as a middle man until the product is delivered, they will also handle any issues like wrong quantity, cuts, etc), judge the reviews for a product, and if available look at the history of the vendor, until you find a product from a vendor you trust. (I recommend to buy within your country as much as possible, so it doesn't go through customs, it's very rare that something is found, but it can happen)
-now you get to buy, depending on market, you either have cryptocurrency stored in their wallets (not recommend, you will lose it in an exit scam) or you can send it every order. When you send your delivery adress (or the one you want it to go to) encrypt the adress using the sellers public key. Make sure the adress is correct.
-wait for the product, make sure to extend the escrow until the product arrives, if you can't extend it anymore dispute the order, and a moderator will step in
-test the product, use it, and leave a review. PLEASE LEAVE A REVIEW, DNMs only work because of reviews.
Edit: Didn't imagine I would write over 15000 words. Oh well, it was fun. Hope it helps, if you have any questions feel free to ask.
No idea how long this will stay up, I might purge it in 7 days, or never.
submitted by seven_N_A7 to u/seven_N_A7 [link] [comments]

Gridcoin 5.0.0.0-Mandatory "Fern" Release

https://github.com/gridcoin-community/Gridcoin-Research/releases/tag/5.0.0.0
Finally! After over ten months of development and testing, "Fern" has arrived! This is a whopper. 240 pull requests merged. Essentially a complete rewrite that was started with the scraper (the "neural net" rewrite) in "Denise" has now been completed. Practically the ENTIRE Gridcoin specific codebase resting on top of the vanilla Bitcoin/Peercoin/Blackcoin vanilla PoS code has been rewritten. This removes the team requirement at last (see below), although there are many other important improvements besides that.
Fern was a monumental undertaking. We had to encode all of the old rules active for the v10 block protocol in new code and ensure that the new code was 100% compatible. This had to be done in such a way as to clear out all of the old spaghetti and ring-fence it with tightly controlled class implementations. We then wrote an entirely new, simplified ruleset for research rewards and reengineered contracts (which includes beacon management, polls, and voting) using properly classed code. The fundamentals of Gridcoin with this release are now on a very sound and maintainable footing, and the developers believe the codebase as updated here will serve as the fundamental basis for Gridcoin's future roadmap.
We have been testing this for MONTHS on testnet in various stages. The v10 (legacy) compatibility code has been running on testnet continuously as it was developed to ensure compatibility with existing nodes. During the last few months, we have done two private testnet forks and then the full public testnet testing for v11 code (the new protocol which is what Fern implements). The developers have also been running non-staking "sentinel" nodes on mainnet with this code to verify that the consensus rules are problem-free for the legacy compatibility code on the broader mainnet. We believe this amount of testing is going to result in a smooth rollout.
Given the amount of changes in Fern, I am presenting TWO changelogs below. One is high level, which summarizes the most significant changes in the protocol. The second changelog is the detailed one in the usual format, and gives you an inkling of the size of this release.

Highlights

Protocol

Note that the protocol changes will not become active until we cross the hard-fork transition height to v11, which has been set at 2053000. Given current average block spacing, this should happen around October 4, about one month from now.
Note that to get all of the beacons in the network on the new protocol, we are requiring ALL beacons to be validated. A two week (14 day) grace period is provided by the code, starting at the time of the transition height, for people currently holding a beacon to validate the beacon and prevent it from expiring. That means that EVERY CRUNCHER must advertise and validate their beacon AFTER the v11 transition (around Oct 4th) and BEFORE October 18th (or more precisely, 14 days from the actual date of the v11 transition). If you do not advertise and validate your beacon by this time, your beacon will expire and you will stop earning research rewards until you advertise and validate a new beacon. This process has been made much easier by a brand new beacon "wizard" that helps manage beacon advertisements and renewals. Once a beacon has been validated and is a v11 protocol beacon, the normal 180 day expiration rules apply. Note, however, that the 180 day expiration on research rewards has been removed with the Fern update. This means that while your beacon might expire after 180 days, your earned research rewards will be retained and can be claimed by advertising a beacon with the same CPID and going through the validation process again. In other words, you do not lose any earned research rewards if you do not stake a block within 180 days and keep your beacon up-to-date.
The transition height is also when the team requirement will be relaxed for the network.

GUI

Besides the beacon wizard, there are a number of improvements to the GUI, including new UI transaction types (and icons) for staking the superblock, sidestake sends, beacon advertisement, voting, poll creation, and transactions with a message. The main screen has been revamped with a better summary section, and better status icons. Several changes under the hood have improved GUI performance. And finally, the diagnostics have been revamped.

Blockchain

The wallet sync speed has been DRASTICALLY improved. A decent machine with a good network connection should be able to sync the entire mainnet blockchain in less than 4 hours. A fast machine with a really fast network connection and a good SSD can do it in about 2.5 hours. One of our goals was to reduce or eliminate the reliance on snapshots for mainnet, and I think we have accomplished that goal with the new sync speed. We have also streamlined the in-memory structures for the blockchain which shaves some memory use.
There are so many goodies here it is hard to summarize them all.
I would like to thank all of the contributors to this release, but especially thank @cyrossignol, whose incredible contributions formed the backbone of this release. I would also like to pay special thanks to @barton2526, @caraka, and @Quezacoatl1, who tirelessly helped during the testing and polishing phase on testnet with testing and repeated builds for all architectures.
The developers are proud to present this release to the community and we believe this represents the starting point for a true renaissance for Gridcoin!

Summary Changelog

Accrual

Changed

Most significantly, nodes calculate research rewards directly from the magnitudes in EACH superblock between stakes instead of using a two- or three- point average based on a CPID's current magnitude and the magnitude for the CPID when it last staked. For those long-timers in the community, this has been referred to as "Superblock Windows," and was first done in proof-of-concept form by @denravonska.

Removed

Beacons

Added

Changed

Removed

Unaltered

As a reminder:

Superblocks

Added

Changed

Removed

Voting

Added

Changed

Removed

Detailed Changelog

[5.0.0.0] 2020-09-03, mandatory, "Fern"

Added

Changed

Removed

Fixed

submitted by jamescowens to gridcoin [link] [comments]

PSA: Enable Tor as a simple way to make your node reachable.

Become one of the 10% of node operators that receive incoming connections.
Installing bitcoin core is easy, and with pruning it really isn't the space sink it is characterized as. Even a modest computer can complete the initial block download (IBD) and become a full node. But what some users (90%) find a bit more challenging, is how to become a listening node. Listening nodes are an important part of the network, and are simple enough to enable. I can think of 4 ways to do it:
  1. Operate on an OS and Network that support uPnP, allowing bitcoin to open the ports for you.
  2. Subscribe to a VPN that allows you to open ports through their service.
  3. Manually configure your OS and network to forward port 8333 and 18333.
  4. Run Tor and direct bitcoin to listen through it.
I'll discuss #4. Obviously #1 or #2 are easier, but require a VPN subscription or uPnP enabled HW. And if you live in a dorm or don't control the network, Tor may be the only free option available.
As a bit of background, bitcoin supports three networks that your node can listen on:
Obviously, the more you enable, the better, but here are the basic steps for Tor in broad strokes. If you have any questions post them here and I'll see if we can't help you out:
  1. Download, verify1 and install Gpg4win
  2. Download, verify2, install, and launch Tor Browser
  3. Download, verify3, install, and launch Bitcoin Core
  4. Launch and Admin command console in the directory containing tor.exe
  5. Install the Tor service: tor.exe --service install
  6. CD to service dir: cd %windir%\ServiceProfiles\LocalService\AppData\Roaming\tor
  7. Create and edit a file called torrc with the contents suggested below
  8. Restart tor: tor.exe --service stop && tor.exe --service start
  9. Record the hostname: type .\HiddenService\hostname as
  10. Add the bitcoin.conf options suggested below
  11. Restart the bitcoin-qt program
  12. (Optional) Activate the bitnodes crawler at https://bitnodes.io/nodes/-8333/
It may take a while for your node to show up on bitnodes. I've found the check button sometimes has trouble with onions. Of course you don't need to do it, but it can provide a simple way to check status once your on the list.

torrc file: (replace c:\windows with the proper path as needed)

```

Change to C:\Windows\ServiceProfiles\LocalService\AppData\Roaming

Log notice file \tor\service.log

Bridges may be needed if the Gov't shuts down Tor exit nodes. Get Bridges by

emailing [email protected] from Gmail (only) and uncomment as follows:

Bridge obfs4 : cert= iat-mode=

HiddenServiceDir \tor\HiddenService HiddenServiceVersion 2 HiddenServicePort 8333 127.0.0.1:8333 HiddenServicePort 18333 127.0.0.1:18333 ```

bitcoin.conf file: (entries to be ADDED)

```

Change to what you recorded earlier

onion=127.0.0.1:9050 listen=1 externalip= discover=1 ```
Footnotes:
  • 1 Cert: {Subject: Intevation GmbH; SHA1: c13a65963ad53e78694dd223d518007791a05fe4}
  • 2 PGP Signing Key: 0xEF6E286DDA85EA2A4BA7DE684E2C6E8793298290
  • 3 PGP Signing Key: 0x01EA5486DE18A882D4C2684590C8019E36C2E964
submitted by brianddk to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Windows / Linux Guide to using Trezor with Bitcoin Core (HWI)

This is a guide to using your Trezor with Bitcoin Core. It may seem like more trouble than it's worth but many applications use Bitcoin Core as a wallet such as LND, EPS, and JoinMarket. Learning how to integrate your Trezor into a Bitcoin Core install is rather useful in many unexpected ways. I did this all through the QT interfaces, but it's simple to script. There is a much simpler guide available from the HWI github, and the smallest Linux TLDR is here
Unfortunately, I don't have access to a Coldcard or Ledger. I'm not sure how the setpin or -stdinpass parameters are handled on that HW.

( A ) Install TrezorCTL, HWI, and build GUI

You only need to set the wallet up once, but may repeat to upgrade

( A.I ) Download extract and install HWI

  1. Download and isntall Python
  2. Download https://github.com/bitcoin-core/HWI/archive/1.1.2.zip
  3. Extract it to a working folder (assumes C:\User\Reddit\src\HWI)
  4. Change Directory (cd) to working folder cd "C:\User\Reddit\src\HWI"
  5. Setup venv python -m venv .venv
  6. Enter venv .venv\Scripts\activate.bat 1
  7. Install dependencies python -m pip install -U setuptools pip wheel
  8. Install TrezorCTL python -m pip install trezor[hidapi]
  9. Install HWI python -m pip install hwi pyside2
  10. Download github.com/libusb/libusb/releases/download/v1.0.23/libusb-1.0.23.7z
  11. Extract MS64\dll\libusb-1.0.dll from the archive
  12. Copy to pywin copy libusb-1.0.dll .venv\Lib\site-packages\pywin32_system32\

( A.II ) Build the QT UI files

  1. Download and install MSYS2
  2. Launch a mingw64.exe shell
  3. CD to working folder cd "C:\User\Reddit\src\HWI"
  4. Enter venv source .venv/Scripts/activate 1
  5. Run UI build bash contrib/generate-ui.sh

( B ) Create a Trezor wallet in Bitcoin Core (testnet)

You only need to set the wallet up once, no private key data is stored, only xpub data

( B.I ) Retrieve keypool from HWI-QT

  1. Launch hwi-qt.exe --testnet (assuming testnet)
  2. Click Set passphrase (if needed) to cache your passphrase then click Refresh
  3. Select you trezor from the list then click Set Pin (if needed)
  4. Ensure your Trezor in the dropdown has a fingerprint
  5. Select Change keypool options and choose P2WPKH
  6. Copy all the text from the Keypool textbox

( B.II ) Create the wallet in Bitcoin QT

  1. Launch Bitcoin Core (testnet) (non-pruned) 2
  2. Select Console from the Window menu
  3. Create a wallet createwallet "hwi" true
  4. Ensure that hwi is selected in the console wallet dropdown
  5. Verify walletname using the getwalletinfo command
  6. Import keypool importmulti '' (note ' caging)
  7. Rescan if TXNs are missing rescanblockchain 3

( C.I ) Grab Tesnet coins

  1. Select the Receive tab in Bitcoin Core (testnet)
  2. Ensure that the Wallet dropdown has hwi selected
  3. Select Create new receiving address and copy address
  4. Google "bitcoin testnet faucet" and visit a few sites
  5. Answer captcha and input your addressed copied from C.I.3

( D ) Spending funds with HWI

This is how you can spend funds in your Trezor using Bitcoin Core (testnet)

( D.I ) Create an unsigned PSBT

  1. Select the Send tab in Bitcoin Core (testnet)
  2. Ensure that the Wallet dropdown has hwi selected
  3. Verify your balance in Watch-only balance
  4. Rescan if balance is wrong (see B.II.7) 3
  5. Craft your TXN as usual, then click Create Unsigned
  6. Copy the PSBT to your clipboard when prompted

( D.II ) Sign your PSBT

  1. In HWI-QT click Sign PSBT
  2. Paste what you copied in D.I.6 in PSBT to Sign field
  3. Click Sign PSBT
  4. Copy the text for PSBT Result

( D.III ) Broadcast your TXN

  1. Select the Console window in Bitcoin Core (testnet)
  2. Ensure that the Wallet dropdown has hwi selected
  3. Finalize PSBT: finalizepsbt
  4. Copy the signed TXN hex from the hex field returned
  5. Broadcast TXN: sendrawtransaction

Final Thoughts

I did this all through the GUI interfaces for the benefit of the Windows users. Windows console is fine, but the quote escaping in windows console is nightmarish. Powershell would be good, but that throws this on a whole another level for most Windows folks.
There is also the need to use HWI-QT due to a bug in blank passphrases on the commandline. You can work around it by toggling passphrase off or on, but again, it's more than I wanted to spell out.
Footnotes:
  • 1. - Later version of python put the activate script under 'bin' instead of 'Script'
  • 2. - You can run pruned, but you need to have a fresh wallet
  • 3. - Rescan is automatic on 'importmulti' but I was pruned so it was wierd
submitted by brianddk to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

[ Bitcoin ] Anatomy of the Bitcoin Node filesystem

Topic originally posted in Bitcoin by brianddk [link]
There are man explanations like this, but this one is mine.
Just in case anyone was curious. I dug up some good posts on this and thought I'd distill it as best I could. I'll be using Windows file separators, but fee free to change them in your head.
If you name a -datadir argument, this is what will land there. If one is not named it defaults to %APPDATA%\Bitcoin
If you name a -blocksdir argument, this is what will land there. If one is not named it defaults to
  • \blocks\blk*.dat - The raw block data
  • \blocks\rev*.dat - The Undo files. List of spent UTXOs for each block
If you name a -main.walletdir argument, this is what will land there. If one is not named it defaults to \wallets or just if the wallets subdirectory doesn't exist.
  • \wallet.dat - The wallet file with private keys and UTXOs
  • \db.log - Database log of access to wallet
Note that -datadir, -blocksdir and -main.walletdir can all point to different storage. The things you need to keep in mind:
  1. -datadir should be your FASTEST storage
  2. -blocksdir should be your LARGEST storage
  3. -main.walletdir should be your most SECURE storage
As a footnote, testnet will through a testnet3\ in everything, and would require a -test.walletdir switch to set the wallet directory.
brianddk your post has been copied because one or more comments in this topic have been removed. This copy will preserve unmoderated topic. If you would like to opt-out, please send a message using [this link].
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submitted by anticensor_bot to u/anticensor_bot [link] [comments]

How to run Bitcoin Core 0.20.0 on Ubuntu Server 20.04 LTS using a Raspberry Pi 4 (or Virtual Machine)

I was helping someone on twitter with this so I figured I'd share the information here as well so that other people would have an easier time than I did.
I'm going to explain how to do this setup on a Raspberry Pi, but note that this should work on a VM as well. You can also set up and run the node headless this way, but I will be explaining how to set up the node using a monitor that you can then later disconnect and access remotely once everything is setup.
Hardware:
-Raspberry Pi 4 (2GB RAM minimum) preferably 4GB RAM -Raspberry Pi 4 Heatsinks -Raspberry Pi 4 case -Micro HDMI cable -USB-C power cable and wall adapter -Monitor -Keyboard and mouse -Ethernet cable (Optional) -16GB or larger microSD card -500GB or larger external hard drive (SSD or portable)
Node Requirements: -50 KBps upload internet speeds (Most people should have this) -Unlimited or high data cap internet download/upload service -6 hours or longer per day dedicated run time
Okay, once you have the hardware its time to get started!
The first thing you'll need to do is install the Raspberry Pi imager, this is how we're going to install Ubuntu onto our Raspberry Pi. After your download and install finishes, open the imager.
  1. Click the "choose OS" box and from the list select Ubuntu, then select Ubuntu Server 20.04 LTS (Raspberry Pi 2/3/4).
  2. Insert your microSD card to your computer directly or via a USB converter. Click "choose SD card" and select your inserted microSD card.
  3. Click "Write" and wait for the imager to finish flashing the OS onto your card
When it is done, remove the SD card and reinsert it to access the files installed. You can choose the overclock the Raspberry Pi by editing the config file. To connect to the Raspberry Pi remotely, you'll need to create an SSH file. If you're on windows this is pretty easy. In the File Explorer, highlight the address bar at the top, erase the text and type cmd, press enter and the Command Prompt will pop up. Type the following:
echo\ssh
This will create an SSH file in your SD directory so that you can remote access the Rasberry Pi later. Now you can go ahead and eject the SD card from your computer.
Now we can set up the Raspberry Pi
Go ahead and connect all your peripherals to your Raspberry Pi, insert the microSD, and connect it to power to turn it on. Give it a moment to boot up, then when prompted enter "ubuntu" for the password. It will make you change the password. Afterward, it will print a bunch of information to the screen, write down the IPv4 address, this is the IP address you'll use to remote access the Raspberry Pi. Now, at any time you can remote access your Raspberry Pi by entering a terminal on another PC in your network and typing:
ssh [email protected](your IP address)
The next step is to install a desktop. There are plenty to choose from so feel free to use a different one than what I use, you can also choose to ignore this and to just work from in the terminal from this point forward.
You need to update all the repositories so type: (Note you'll either have to be connected by ethernet or have edited the network-config file to setup your wifi in advance)
sudo apt-get update
Once it's done updating type the following to upgrade your system:
sudo apt-get upgrade
Now that you're up-to-date, you can install the desktop using the command:
sudo apt-get install ubuntu-gnome-desktop
This will take a while to download and install so just sit back and let it do its thing. Once it's done downloading, restart your Raspberry Pi and log in with the password you changed earlier. Your first boot may take a while so just be patient, don't freak out if you see a single purple square in the center of the screen while it's loading. You should now have the Ubuntu desktop ready to go and now it's on to installing Bitcoin Core!
Installing Bitcoin Core 0.20.0
Since we're running Ubuntu Server 20.04 LTS, it should come preinstalled with the Snap Store. This makes installing apps very easy and works similar to pip install in Python. Simply open your terminal and type:
sudo snap install bitcoin-core
This will install Bitcoin Core into your Snap folder and will add the application to your system. Unfortunately, there are still a few steps left before we can begin downloading the blockchain. By default, Bitcoin Core doesn't have the removable-media Plug connected to the Socket. You can view this by typing:
snap connections bitcoin-core
This means when you try installing everything onto your external hard drive, Bitcoin Core won't be able to identify it or write to it even when passed the directory path. To fix this first locate your Snap folder, make a copy of the bitcoin-core folder inside, and paste it into your external drive.
NOTE: You must make a copy, you can't just move the snap file to the external drive.
Now, you can connect the removable-media Plug to the Socket by typing:
sudo snap connect bitcoin-core:removable-media :removable-media
This gives you the read/write permissions necessary to access the /media path. Finally, you can now launch Bitcoin Core and select "use a custom directory path" when prompted. Highlight the current directory path and replace it with the path to your external hard drive, it should look something like this:
/media/(external drive)/bitcoin-core/common/.bitcoin
This is why we had to make a copy of the bitcoin-core folder to the external drive earlier, the Bitcoin Core application will create the new data directory through ".bitcoin". Hit "Okay" and the application will begin synchronizing with the network! Once the synchronization is finished your very own node will be up and running!
EDIT: (08/01/2020) Bitcoin Core 0.20.01 has been released, I will update the tutorial soon with how to run the latest release.
submitted by Noblefire_62 to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Windows Guide to using Trezor with Bitcoin Core (HWI)

This is a guide to using your Trezor with Bitcoin Core. It may seem like more trouble than it's worth but many applications use Bitcoin Core as a wallet such as LND, EPS, and JoinMarket. Learning how to integrate your Trezor into a Bitcoin Core install is rather useful in many unexpected ways. I did this all through the QT interfaces, but it's simple to script. There is a much simpler guide available from the HWI github, and the smallest TLDR is here

( A ) Install TrezorCTL, HWI, and build GUI

You only need to set the wallet up once, but may repeat to upgrade

( A.I ) Download extract and install HWI

  1. Download and isntall Python
  2. Download https://github.com/bitcoin-core/HWI/archive/1.1.2.zip
  3. Extract it to a working folder (assumes C:\User\Reddit\src\HWI)
  4. Change Directory (cd) to working folder cd "C:\User\Reddit\src\HWI"
  5. Setup venv python -m venv .venv
  6. Enter venv .venv\Scripts\activate.bat 1
  7. Install dependencies python -m pip install -U setuptools pip wheel
  8. Install TrezorCTL python -m pip install trezor[hidapi]
  9. Install HWI python -m pip install hwi pyside2
  10. Download github.com/libusb/libusb/releases/download/v1.0.23/libusb-1.0.23.7z
  11. Extract MS64\dll\libusb-1.0.dll from the archive
  12. Copy to pywin copy libusb-1.0.dll .venv\Lib\site-packages\pywin32_system32\

( A.II ) Build the QT UI files

  1. Download and install MSYS2
  2. Launch a mingw64.exe
  3. CD to working folder cd "C:\User\Reddit\src\HWI"
  4. Enter venv source .venv/Scripts/activate 1
  5. Run UI build bash contrib/generate-ui.sh

( B ) Create a Trezor wallet in Bitcoin Core (testnet)

You only need to set the wallet up once, no private key data is stored, only xpub data

( B.I ) Retrieve keypool from HWI-QT

  1. Launch hwi-qt.exe --testnet (assuming testnet)
  2. Click Set passphrase (if needed) to cache your passphrase then click Refresh
  3. Select you trezor from the list then click Set Pin (if needed)
  4. Ensure your Trezor in the dropdown has a fingerprint
  5. Select Change keypool options and choose P2WPKH
  6. Copy all the text from the Keypool textbox

( B.II ) Create the wallet in Bitcoin QT

  1. Launch Bitcoin Core (testnet) (non-pruned) 2
  2. Select Console from the Window menu
  3. Create a wallet createwallet "hwi" true
  4. Ensure that hwi is selected in the console wallet dropdown
  5. Verify walletname using the getwalletinfo command
  6. Import keypool importmulti '' (note ' caging)
  7. Rescan if TXNs are missing rescanblockchain 3

( C.I ) Grab Tesnet coins

  1. Select the Receive tab in Bitcoin Core (testnet)
  2. Ensure that the Wallet dropdown has hwi selected
  3. Select Create new receiving address and copy address
  4. Google "bitcoin testnet faucet" and visit a few sites
  5. Answer captcha and input your addressed copied from C.I.3

( D ) Spending funds with HWI

This is how you can spend funds in your Trezor using Bitcoin Core (testnet)

( D.I ) Create an unsigned PSBT

  1. Select the Send tab in Bitcoin Core (testnet)
  2. Ensure that the Wallet dropdown has hwi selected
  3. Verify your balance in Watch-only balance
  4. Rescan if balance is wrong (see B.II.7) 3
  5. Craft your TXN as usual, then click Create Unsigned
  6. Copy the PSBT to your clipboard when prompted

( D.II ) Sign your PSBT

  1. In HWI-QT click Sign PSBT
  2. Paste what you copied in D.I.6 in PSBT to Sign field
  3. Click Sign PSBT
  4. Copy the text for PSBT Result

( D.III ) Broadcast your TXN

  1. Select the Console window in Bitcoin Core (testnet)
  2. Ensure that the Wallet dropdown has hwi selected
  3. Finalize PSBT: finalizepsbt
  4. Copy the signed TXN hex from the hex field returned
  5. Broadcast TXN: sendrawtransaction

Final Thoughts

I did this all through the GUI interfaces for the benefit of the Windows users. Windows console is fine, but the quote escaping in windows console is nightmarish. Powershell would be good, but that throws this on a whole another level for most Windows folks.
There is also the need to use HWI-QT due to a bug in blank passphrases on the commandline. You can work around it by toggling passphrase off or on, but again, it's more than I wanted to spell out.
Footnotes:
  • 1. - Later version of python put the activate script under 'bin' instead of 'Script'
  • 2. - You can run pruned, but you need to have a fresh wallet
  • 3. - Rescan is automatic on 'importmulti' but I was pruned so it was wierd
submitted by brianddk to TREZOR [link] [comments]

Test

Test
There is a fairly small subset of Bitcoin users that run a full node. I think the idea of running a full node has gotten a bad rap over the years since there is so much talk about running on a Raspberry Pi, or getting zippy SSDs. Although all of this can be fun, it is often not really required at all. Here are some ways to run a full node starting with the very simple. I'll get into more complex configs, but these are all optional.

Tech Skill Level: 0 (the basics)

  1. Download Bitcoin Core
  2. Launch the downloaded installer and install the app
  3. Launch the installed "Bitcoin Core" app and let it run overnight
In many cases, thats it. If your running a new machine with a fairly good internet connection, 8 or 9 hours will be enough to complete the "Initial Block Download" (IBD). This may fill up your drive a bit, but again, on most new machines, 300 GB of space isn't that hard to come by.

Tech Skill Level: 1 (encrypted wallet)

One thing we left out in the level-0 exercise is encrypting your wallet. It's easy enough to do well, but a bit more difficult to do right. The main challenge is that humans generate really poor passwords. If you want a good password, the best way is to use something called "diceware". Basically, you just grab 4 or 5 dice and each throw of the dice represents a certain word on a special list. The throw {1,4,5,3,1} for example would be the word camping on the EFF-diceware-wordlist. So you repeat this a few times until you have a list of 8 or so words which becomes the passphrase you use to encrypt your wallet. Write it down, it is always hard to remember at first. So at level-1 your list becomes:
  1. Download Bitcoin Core
  2. Launch the downloaded installer and install the app
  3. Launch the installed "Bitcoin Core" app and let it run overnight
  4. Choose Encrypt Wallet from the Settings Menu
  5. Enter your 8 word (or so) passphrase generated using the Diceware method

Wallet Encryption Dialog

Tech Skill Level: 2 (enable pruning if needed)

Though I said "300 GB of space isn't hard to come by", some times it actually is. If space is an issue, a simple way to fix it is to tell bitcoin to simple take less space. This is called "pruning" and can take that number from 300 GB down to below 5 GB. If you can't find 5 GB, then you'll have to read ahead to level-3 to add USB storage. But the good news is, enabling pruning is pretty easy, we just add another step to our working list:
  1. Download Bitcoin Core
  2. Launch the downloaded installer and install the app
  3. Launch the installed "Bitcoin Core" app and let it run overnight
  4. Do the wallet encryption steps here if you wish
  5. Choose Options from the Settings Menu
  6. Choose Prune block storage to: and select the max size for the blocks to use
  7. Exit and restart the bitcoin application for the changes to take effect

Pruning Dialog
Note, even setting this to 1 GB will still leave you with about a 4.5 GB install. The blocks take up a lot of space, but the chainstate and other folders eat up at least 3.5 GB and they can't be pruned. Also, be aware, to disable pruning requires you to perform the entire IBD again. While pruned some other functions my be disabled as well, so just know that pruning does limit some functionality.

Tech Skill Level: 3 (verify the installer)

Although this is arguably something that should be done at level-0, some find the intricacies of comparing hash (thumbprint) values to be tedious and beyond the scope of a beginner. You will find these types of hash compares suggested quite often as a way to prevent running tainted programs. Programs are often tainted by bad disk or network performance, but most often, taint is malicious code inserted by viruses or malware. This is a way to guard yourself against those types of attacks. What I cover here is a very basic comparison on the certificate, but a more thorough comparison advised by mosts uses a program called Gpg4Win, and is beyond the scope of this beginners guide. But regardless, most users should strive to do this minimum level of validation.
  1. Download Bitcoin Core
  2. Launch the downloaded installer
  3. When prompted "Do you want to allow..." click Show more details
  4. In the details section select Show information about the publisher's certificate
  5. In the certificate window select the Details tab
  6. In the Details tab Subject should start with "CN = Bitcoin Core Code Signing Association"
  7. Also ensure Thumbprint reads ea27d3cefb3eb715ed214176a5d027e01ba1ee86
  8. If the checks pass, click OK to exit the certificate window and Yes to allow the installer to run.
  9. Launch the installed "Bitcoin Core" app and let it run overnight
  10. Do the wallet encryption steps here if you wish
  11. Do the optional pruning steps here if you wish

Certification Validation Windows
Note: The certificate used to sign the current Bitcoin installer is only valid from March 2020 to March 2021. After that point the thumbprint on the certificate will change. This is by design and intentional. If your reading this post after March 2021, then it is understood that the thumbprint has changed.

Tech Skill Level: 4 (use secondary storage)

We glossed over the "new machine with fairly good internet" part. Truth me known many people do not have fairly new machines, and find the IBD to take longer than the "over night" best wishes. For most people the slowdown is the disk access when calculating what is called chainstate. This requires fast random reads and writes to the disk. If you have an SSD disk, this will be no problem, but if you have a non-SSD "spinning" disk, random writes are always slow. Though an SSD will speed things up, they are pricey, so a nice middle ground may be a simple high-end USB key drive. You can get some with 10 to 15 MB/s random writes which is usually a order of magnitude faster than a "spinning" disk. And with pruning (see level-2), a small USB drive should be fine.
Once you decide on a drive, the tricky part will be to enable external storage. It requires editing a configuration file and adding a few lines. The configuration file needs to be in both the default directory, and USB key drive, but before we do that, we want to create a directory on the key drive. You will need to determine the drive letter of your USB key drive. For the sake of this example, we will assume it is D:, but you must determine this yourself and correct the example. Once you know the drive letter, create a blank folder on the drive called Bitcoin. So for this example, creating Bitcoin on drive D: will create the path D:\Bitcoin. Once done, assuming that D: is your drive, here are the steps to edit the two configuration files:
  1. Download Bitcoin Core
  2. Launch the installer, verify it, then run it
  3. Launch the installed "Bitcoin Core" app and let it run overnight
  4. Do the wallet encryption steps here if you wish
  5. Do the optional pruning steps here if you wish
  6. Launch "Notepad" by typing "Notepad.exe" in the windows search bar then click Open
  7. Type the line datadir=D:\Bitcoin (depending on your drive letter) in the blank file
  8. Choose Save from the File menu in notepad
  9. Type %APPDATA%\Bitcoin\bitcoin.conf (note the percent signs) in the File name box
  10. Select All Files from the Save as type dropdown
  11. Click the Save button and overwrite the file if prompted
  12. Exit and restart the bitcoin application for the changes to take effect

Save As Dialog
Now that you've reached this level of technical expertise, there are many new configuration options that you can begin to modify if you wish. Most configuration data is contained in the bitcoin.conf file and learning how to maintain it is a key step for a node operator.

Tech Skill Level: 5 (all other customizations)

Here's a short list of various things you can ADD to your bitcoin.conf file. You generally just add a new line for each configuration settings.
  • addresstype=bech32
  • changetype=bech32
The addresstype / changetype allows your wallet to use the native-segwit (bech32) format. This is the most efficient and inexpensive way to spend bitcoin, and is a recommended configuration. The default uses something called p2sh-segwit which is more compatible with older wallets, but more expensive to spend.
  • minrelaytxfee=0.00000011
Changing the minrelaytxfee setting allows you to help propagate lower fee transactions. It will require more memory but TXN memory is capped at 300 MB by default anyways, so if you have enough memory, it is a good setting to choose.
  • dbcache=2048
The dbcache setting controls how many MB of memory the program will use for the chainstate database. Since this is a key bottleneck in the IBD, setting this value high (2048 MB) will greatly speed up the IBD, assuming you have the memory to spare
  • blocksdir=C:\Bitcoin
  • datadir=D:\Bitcoin
In level-4 we discussed moving the datadir to a fast external storage, but the majority of the space used for bitcoin is the blocks directory (blocksdir). Although you should always use for fastest storage for datadir, you are free to use slow storage for blocksdir. So if you only want to consume a small amount of your SSD (assumed D:) then you can keep your blocks on your slow "spinning" drive.
  • upnp=1
One of the harder challenges you may face running a node, is to get incoming connections. If you are lucky, you may find that your firewall and network HW support the uPnP protocol. If they do, this setting will allow bitcoin to configure uPnP to allow incoming connections to your node.
submitted by brianddk to brianddk [link] [comments]

List of CFML Vulnerabilities & Security Issues

This list is updated frequently as we detect more issues, also note that we can’t detect these issues in all cases on all servers, even if the issue has not been patched yet.
Here are some CFML Vulnerabilities & Security Issues that you might have faced-

  1. Jakarta Virtual Directory Exposed – The /jakarta virtual directory (which is required by CF10+ on Tomcat/IIS) is serving files such as isapi_redirect.properties or isapi_redirect.log. The only URI that should be served is /jakarta/isapi_redirect.dll – you can use Request Filtering to block.
  2. Bitcoin Miner Discovered – Found files in /CFIDE that match the signature of a bitcoin miner exploit. Look for /CFIDE/m /CFIDE/m32 /CFIDE/m64 and /CFIDE/updates.cfm among others.
  3. Hotfix APSB11-14 Not Installed – Apply the hotfixes located in Adobe Security Notice apsb11-14.
  4. Railo Security Issue 2635 – Input of Chr(0) to the ReplaceList function can cause infinate loop / crash. Fixed in Version 4.1.1.008
  5. XSS Injection in cfform.js – A document.write call was found in your /CFIDE/scripts/cfform.js file, an attacker may be injecting a javascript, please check your cfform.js file.
  6. Executable found in CFIDE – Found executable file(s) in /CFIDE with one of the following file extensions: dll, exe, bat, sh
  7. Heartbleed Vulnerability Detected – The heartbleed vulnerability is a bug in OpenSSL (the crypto library used by Apache, NGinx, and others) that can allow the leakage of private keys used for TLS/SSL encryption.
  8. OpenBD AdminAPI Exposed to the Public – The /bluedragon/adminapi/ directory is open to the public it should be locked down to prevent exploit.
  9. Security Hotfix APSB12-26 Not Installed – The security hotfix referenced in Adobe Security Bulletin APSB12-26 was not found to be installed on your server. This hotfix resolves a sandbox permission issue.
  10. Security Hotfix APSB17-30 Not Installed Or Partailly Installed – The security hotfix referenced in Adobe Security Bulletin APSB17-30 was not found to be fully installed on your server. For the hotfix to be effective you must have Java 8 update 121 or greater installed. This hotfix resolves two critical vulnerabilities CVE-2017-11286 and CVE-2017-11283 / CVE-2017-11284 and one important vulnerability CVE-2017-11285. The issues are resolved in ColdFusion 11 Update 13+ and ColdFusion 2016 Update 5+ with Java 8 update 121 or greater.
  11. ColdFusion Example Applications Installed – The ColdFusion example applications are installed at /cfdocs/exampleapps/ or /CFIDE/gettingstarted/, they should not be installed on a production server.
  12. Svn Hidden Directory Exposed – A request for /.svn/text-base/index.cfm.svn-base appears to resolve to a subversion repository, which could lead to source code disclosure. Please block .svn/
  13. Solr Search Service Exposed – CVE-2010-0185 detected. ColdFusion 9 Apache Solr services are exposed to the public. Any data in solr search collections may be exposed to the public. Follow the instructions in APSB10-04 to remedy, or upgrade to ColdFusion 9.0.1.
  14. TLS Compression Supported – TLS Compression should be disabled due to the CRIME TLS vulnerability.
  15. Security Hotfix APSB11-04 Not Installed – The security hotfix referenced in Adobe Security Bulletin APSB11-04 was not found to be installed on your server. This hotfix also contains most prior security hotfixes.
  16. Git Hidden Directory Exposed – A request for /.git/config appears to resolve to a git repository, wouch could lead to source code disclosure. Please block .git/
  17. Cross Site Scripting Vulnerability CVE-2011-4368 – CVE-2011-4368 detected. Apply the hotfix located in Adobe Security Notice apsb11-29.
  18. JVM Vulnerable to Java Null Byte Injection – The JVM that you are running is vulnerable to null byte injections (or null byte poisioning) in java.io file operations. Java 1.7.0_40+ or 1.8+ attempt to mitigate null byte injection attacks.
  19. Java 11 Security Update Available – The JVM that you are running contains security vulnerabilities that could be exploited in server side environments. Update to the latest version of Java 11. Note that Oracle Java 11 requires a commercial license. Adobe CF customers can download Oracle Java 11 from the ColdFusion Downloads Page. You can also use OpenJDK, Amazon Corretto, or other non-oracle JVMs for free.
  20. Security Hotfix APSB19-10 Not Installed – The security hotfix referenced in Adobe Security Bulletin APSB19-10 was not found to be installed on your server. This hotfix resolves 2 issues, one important (CVE-2019-7092) and one critical (CVE-2019-7091). The issues are resolved in ColdFusion 11 Update 16+ ColdFusion 2016 Update 8+ and ColdFusion 2018 Update 2+. For all security fixes to be effective you should also have Java 8 update 121 or greater installed.
  21. Cross Site Scripting Vulnerability CVE-2011-0583 – CVE-2011-0583 detected. Apply the hotfixes located in Adobe Security Notice apsb11-04. The detection of this vulnerability also indicates to a high degree of likelihood that the following vulnerabilities may also exist: CVE-2011-0580, CVE-2011-0581, CVE-2011-0582, CVE-2011-0584
  22. Apache 2.2 Security Update Available – The version of Apache you are running does not contain the most recent security fixes.
  23. BlaseDS/AMF External XML Entity Injection – CVE-2009-3960 detected. You must apply the hotfix specified in Adobe Security Bulliten APSB10-05, otherwise an attacker can read any file on the server that ColdFusion has permission to read. You need to do this even if you don’t use BlaseDS or Flash Remoting because it is enabled in CF by default.
  24. SSL Version 2 Enabled – Your Web Server is accepting SSL V2 connections, a weak protocol. For PCI compliance, and strong security you must disable this protocol on your web server.
  25. Missing Strict-Transport-Security Header – This domain supports HTTPS but does not send the HTTP Strict-Transport-Security response header (HSTS) to force HTTPS.
  26. The /CFIDE/scripts directory is in default location. – Consider changing the default location of /CFIDE/scripts/ by changing the value of the Default Script Src setting in the ColdFusion Administrator.
  27. Recalled Hotfix 10.0.3 Installed – You are running ColdFusion 10.0.3 which has been recalled by adobe due to bugs in the release. Please install the latest 10.0 hotfix.
  28. ComponentUtils Exposed to the Public – The /CFIDE/componentutils/ directory is open to the public it should be locked down to prevent exploit.
  29. ColdFusion Update Available – You may not be running the latest version of ColdFusion 8, consider updating to ColdFusion 8.0.1
  30. Security Hotfix APSB13-10 Not Installed – The security hotfix referenced in Adobe Security Bulletin APSB13-10 was not found on your server. This hotfix resolves authentication issues that could allow an attacker impersonate a user in your application, or a ColdFusion Administrator.
  31. CVE-2010-2861 Detected – Path Traversal Vulnerability detected (CVE-2010-2861 APSB10-18), this allows an attacker to read any file on the servers file system that ColdFusion has access to (within the same drive on windows).
  32. Security Hotfix APSB13-19 Not Installed – The security hotfix referenced in Adobe Security Bulletin APSB13-19 was not found on your server.
  33. Security Hotfix APSB12-15 Not Installed – The security hotfix referenced in Adobe Security Bulletin APSB12-15 was not found to be installed on your server. This hotfix resolves a HTTP response splitting vulnerability in the ColdFusion Component Browser CVE-2012-2041.
  34. Security Hotfix APSB16-16 Not Installed – The security hotfix referenced in Adobe Security Bulletin APSB16-16 was not found to be installed on your server. This hotfix addresses a XSS issue, a Java Deserialization Vulnerability and a TLS Hostname verification issue. This issue is fixed in ColdFusion 10 Update 19+, ColdFusion 11 Update 8+, and ColdFusion 2016 Update 1+
  35. Vulnerable PageSpeed Module – The Version of PageSpeed Module you are using may be vulnerable to one or more vulnerabilities. Update your PageSpeed web server module to the latest version to resolve.
  36. TLS 1.2 Is Not Enabled – Configure your server to accept TLS 1.2 connections for optimal HTTPS security. Note for IIS you must be running Windows 2008r2 or greater for TLS 1.2 support. You can use our IIS SSL / TLS configuration tool to toggle protocol support on your server.
  37. Java 13 EOL – Java 13 has reached end of life at the release of Java 14. It is not a LTS (Long Term Support Version), you can use Java 11 for LTS.
  38. Lucee Security Issue 2015-08-06 – Lucee fixed an XSS issue in version 4.5.1.023. This issue remains unpatched in Railo.
submitted by aligatorraid to coldfusion [link] [comments]

Bitcoin Tor

Subject: PSA: Make your node reachable by using Tor
There is usually a post every few months with someone asking for tips on how to make their node reachable. It's always a hard question to answer since its impossible to know what type of routers and firewalls they are going to have to punch through. This is especially difficult in college dorms. One cheap (and easy) way around it is to to just jump through a few extra steps to make your bitcoin node a bitcoin onion node. Tor is great about traversing routers and firewalls like a hot knife through butter.
  1. Download, verify1, install and initialize Gpg4win
  2. Download, verify2, install, and launch Tor Browser
  3. Download, verify3, install, and launch Bitcoin Core
  4. Launch an Admin command console in the directory with tor.exe
  5. Install the Tor service: tor.exe --service install
  6. CD to service dir: cd %windir%\ServiceProfiles\LocalService\AppData\Roaming\tor
  7. Create and edit a file called torrc with the contents suggested below
  8. Restart tor: tor --service stop && tor --service start
  9. Record your onion hostname: type .\HiddenService\hostname as
  10. Add the bitcoin.conf options suggested below
  11. Restart the bitcoin-qt program
  12. Verify node connectivity at https://bitnodes.io/nodes/-8333/

torrc file: (replace c:\windows with the proper path as needed)

```

Change to C:\Windows\ServiceProfiles\LocalService\AppData\Roaming

Log notice file \tor\service.log HiddenServiceDir \tor\HiddenService HiddenServiceVersion 2 HiddenServicePort 8333 127.0.0.1:8333 HiddenServicePort 18333 127.0.0.1:18333 ```

bitcoin.conf file: (entries to be ADDED)

```

Change to what you recorded earlier

onion=127.0.0.1:9050 listen=1 externalip= discover=1 ```
Footnotes:
  • 1 - Cert-Subject: "Intevation GmbH"  ;  Cert-SHA1: c13a65963ad53e78694dd223d518007791a05fe4
  • 2 - PGP Signing Key: 0xEF6E286DDA85EA2A4BA7DE684E2C6E8793298290
  • 3 - PGP Signing Key: 0x01EA5486DE18A882D4C2684590C8019E36C2E964
submitted by brianddk to brianddk [link] [comments]

Filecoin | Development Status and Mining Progress

Author: Gamals Ahmed, CoinEx Business Ambassador
https://preview.redd.it/5bqakdqgl3g51.jpg?width=865&format=pjpg&auto=webp&s=b709794863977eb6554e3919b9e00ca750e3e704
A decentralized storage network that transforms cloud storage into an account market. Miners obtain the integrity of the original protocol by providing data storage and / or retrieval. On the contrary, customers pay miners to store or distribute data and retrieve it.
Filecoin announced, that there will be more delays before its main network is officially launched.
Filecoin developers postponed the release date of their main network to late July to late August 2020.
As mentioned in a recent announcement, the Filecoin team said that the initiative completed the first round of the internal protocol security audit. Platform developers claim that the results of the review showed that they need to make several changes to the protocol’s code base before performing the second stage of the software testing process.
Created by Protocol Labs, Filecoin was developed using File System (IPFS), which is a peer-to-peer data storage network. Filecoin will allow users to trade storage space in an open and decentralized market.
Filecoin developers implemented one of the largest cryptocurrency sales in 2017. They have privately obtained over $ 200 million from professional or accredited investors, including many institutional investors.
The main network was slated to launch last month, but in February 2020, the Philly Queen development team delayed the release of the main network between July 15 and July 17, 2020.
They claimed that the outbreak of the Coronavirus (COVID-19) in China was the main cause of the delay. The developers now say that they need more time to solve the problems found during a recent codecase audit.
The Filecoin team noted the following:
“We have drafted a number of protocol changes to ensure that building our major network launch is safe and economically sound.” The project developers will add them to two different implementations of Filecoin (Lotus and go-filecoin) in the coming weeks.
Filecoin developers conducted a survey to allow platform community members to cast their votes on three different launch dates for Testnet Phase 2 and mainnet.
The team reported that the community gave their votes. Based on the vote results, the Filecoin team announced a “conservative” estimate that the second phase of the network test should begin by May 11, 2020. The main Filecoin network may be launched sometime between July 20 and August 21, 2020.
The updates to the project can be found on the Filecoin Road Map.
Filecoin developers stated:
“This option will make us get the most important protocol changes first, and then implement the rest as protocol updates during testnet.” Filecoin is back down from the final test stage.
Another filecoin decentralized storage network provider launched its catalytic test network, the final stage of the storage network test that supports the blockchain.
In a blog post on her website, Filecoin said she will postpone the last test round until August. The company also announced a calibration period from July 20 to August 3 to allow miners to test their mining settings and get an idea of how competition conditions affected their rewards.
Filecoin had announced earlier last month that the catalytic testnet test would precede its flagship launch. The delay in the final test also means that the company has returned the main launch window between August 31 and September 21.
Despite the lack of clear incentives for miners and multiple delays, Filecoin has succeeded in attracting huge interest, especially in China. Investors remained highly speculating on the network’s mining hardware and its premium price.
Mining in Filecoin
In most blockchain protocols, “miners” are network participants who do the work necessary to promote and maintain the blockchain. To provide these services, miners are compensated in the original cryptocurrency.
Mining in Filecoin works completely differently — instead of contributing to computational power, miners contribute storage capacity to use for dealing with customers looking to store data.
Filecoin will contain several types of miners:
Storage miners responsible for storing files and data on the network. Miners retrieval, responsible for providing quick tubes for file recovery. Miners repair to be carried out.
Storage miners are the heart of the network. They earn Filecoin by storing data for clients, and computerizing cipher directories to check storage over time. The probability of earning the reward reward and transaction fees is proportional to the amount of storage that the Miner contributes to the Filecoin network, not the hash power.
Retriever miners are the veins of the network. They earn Filecoin by winning bids and mining fees for a specific file, which is determined by the market value of the said file size. Miners bandwidth and recovery / initial transaction response time will determine its ability to close recovery deals on the network.
The maximum bandwidth of the recovery miners will determine the total amount of deals that it can enter into.
In the current implementation, the focus is mostly on storage miners, who sell storage capacity for FIL.

Hardware recommendations

The current system specifications recommended for running the miner are:
Compared to the hardware requirements for running a validity checker, these standards are much higher — although they definitely deserve it. Since these will not increase in the presumed future, the money spent on Filecoin mining hardware will provide users with many years of reliable service, and they pay themselves many times. Think of investing as a small business for cloud storage. To launch a model on the current data hosting model, it will cost millions of dollars in infrastructure and logistics to get started. With Filecoin, you can do the same for a few thousand dollars.
Proceed to mining
Deals are the primary function of the Filecoin network, and it represents an agreement between a client and miners for a “storage” contract.
Once the customer decides to have a miner to store based on the available capacity, duration and price required, he secures sufficient funds in a linked portfolio to cover the total cost of the deal. The deal is then published once the mine accepts the storage agreement. By default, all Filecoin miners are set to automatically accept any deal that meets their criteria, although this can be disabled for miners who prefer to organize their deals manually.
After the deal is published, the customer prepares the data for storage and then transfers it to the miner. Upon receiving all the data, the miner fills in the data in a sector, closes it, and begins to provide proofs to the chain. Once the first confirmation is obtained, the customer can make sure the data is stored correctly, and the deal has officially started.
Throughout the deal, the miner provides continuous proofs to the chain. Clients gradually pay with money they previously closed. If there is missing or late evidence, the miner is punished. More information about this can be found in the Runtime, Cut and Penalties section of this page.
At Filecoin, miners earn two different types of rewards for their efforts: storage fees and reward prevention.
Storage fees are the fees that customers pay regularly after reaching a deal, in exchange for storing data. This fee is automatically deposited into the withdrawal portfolio associated with miners while they continue to perform their duties over time, and is locked for a short period upon receipt.
Block rewards are large sums given to miners calculated on a new block. Unlike storage fees, these rewards do not come from a linked customer; Instead, the new FIL “prints” the network as an inflationary and incentive measure for miners to develop the chain. All active miners on the network have a chance to get a block bonus, their chance to be directly proportional to the amount of storage space that is currently being contributed to the network.
Duration of operation, cutting and penalties
“Slashing” is a feature found in most blockchain protocols, and is used to punish miners who fail to provide reliable uptime or act maliciously against the network.
In Filecoin, miners are susceptible to two different types of cut: storage error cut, unanimously reduce error.
Storage Error Reduction is a term used to include a wider range of penalties, including error fees, sector penalties, and termination fees. Miners must pay these penalties if they fail to provide reliability of the sector or decide to leave the network voluntarily.
An error fee is a penalty that a miner incurs for each non-working day. Sector punishment: A penalty incurred by a miner of a disrupted sector for which no error was reported before the WindowPoSt inspection.
The sector will pay an error fee after the penalty of the sector once the error is discovered.
Termination Fee: A penalty that a miner incurs when a sector is voluntary or involuntarily terminated and removed from the network.
Cutting consensus error is the penalty that a miner incurs for committing consensus errors. This punishment applies to miners who have acted maliciously against the network consensus function.
Filecoin miners
Eight of the top 10 Felticoin miners are Chinese investors or companies, according to the blockchain explorer, while more companies are selling cloud mining contracts and distributed file sharing system hardware. CoinDesk’s Wolfe Chao wrote: “China’s craze for Filecoin may have been largely related to the long-standing popularity of crypto mining in the country overall, which is home to about 65% of the computing power on Bitcoin at discretion.”
With Filecoin approaching the launch of the mainnet blocknet — after several delays since the $ 200 million increase in 2017 — Chinese investors are once again speculating strongly about network mining devices and their premium prices.
Since Protocol Labs, the company behind Filecoin, released its “Test Incentives” program on June 9 that was scheduled to start in a week’s time, more than a dozen Chinese companies have started selling cloud mining contracts and hardware — despite important details such as economics Mining incentives on the main network are still endless.
Sales volumes to date for each of these companies can range from half a million to tens of millions of dollars, according to self-reported data on these platforms that CoinDesk has watched and interviews with several mining hardware manufacturers.
Filecoin’s goal is to build a distributed storage network with token rewards to spur storage hosting as a way to drive wider adoption. Protocol Labs launched a test network in December 2019. But the tokens mined in the testing environment so far are not representative of the true silicon coin that can be traded when the main network is turned on. Moreover, the mining incentive economics on testnet do not represent how final block rewards will be available on the main network.
However, data from Blockecoin’s blocknetin testnet explorers show that eight out of 10 miners with the most effective mining force on testnet are currently Chinese miners.
These eight miners have about 15 petabytes (PB) of effective storage mining power, accounting for more than 85% of the total test of 17.9 petable. For the context, 1 petabyte of hard disk storage = 1000 terabytes (terabytes) = 1 million gigabytes (GB).
Filecoin craze in China may be closely related to the long-standing popularity of crypt mining in the country overall, which is home to about 65% of the computing power on Bitcoin by estimation. In addition, there has been a lot of hype in China about foreign exchange mining since 2018, as companies promote all types of devices when the network is still in development.
“Encryption mining has always been popular in China,” said Andy Tien, co-founder of 1475, one of several mining hardware manufacturers in Philquin supported by prominent Chinese video indicators such as Fenbushi and Hashkey Capital.
“Even though the Velikoyen mining process is more technologically sophisticated, the idea of mining using hard drives instead of specialized machines like Bitcoin ASIC may be a lot easier for retailers to understand,” he said.
Meanwhile, according to Feixiaohao, a Chinese service comparable to CoinMarketCap, nearly 50 Chinese crypto exchanges are often somewhat unknown with some of the more well-known exchanges including Gate.io and Biki — have listed trading pairs for Filecoin currency contracts for USDT.
In bitcoin mining, at the current difficulty level, one segment per second (TH / s) fragmentation rate is expected to generate around 0.000008 BTC within 24 hours. The higher the number of TH / s, the greater the number of bitcoins it should be able to produce proportionately. But in Filecoin, the efficient mining force of miners depends on the amount of data stamped on the hard drive, not the total size of the hard drive.
To close data in the hard drive, the Filecoin miner still needs processing power, i.e. CPU or GPU as well as RAM. More powerful processors with improved software can confine data to the hard drive more quickly, so miners can combine more efficient mining energy faster on a given day.
As of this stage, there appears to be no transparent way at the network level for retail investors to see how much of the purchased hard disk drive was purchased which actually represents an effective mining force.
The U.S.-based Labs Protocol was behind Filecoin’s initial coin offer for 2017, which raised an astonishing $ 200 million.
This was in addition to a $ 50 million increase in private investment supported by notable venture capital projects including Sequoia, Anderson Horowitz and Union Square Ventures. CoinDk’s parent company, CoinDk, has also invested in Protocol Labs.
After rounds of delay, Protocol Protocols said in September 2019 that a testnet launch would be available around December 2019 and the main network would be rolled out in the first quarter of 2020.
The test started as promised, but the main network has been delayed again and is now expected to launch in August 2020. What is Filecoin mining process?
Filecoin mainly consists of three parts: the storage market (the chain), the blockecin Filecoin, and the search market (under the chain). Storage and research market in series and series respectively for security and efficiency. For users, the storage frequency is relatively low, and the security requirements are relatively high, so the storage process is placed on the chain. The retrieval frequency is much higher than the storage frequency when there is a certain amount of data. Given the performance problem in processing data on the chain, the retrieval process under the chain is performed. In order to solve the security issue of payment in the retrieval process, Filecoin adopts the micro-payment strategy. In simple terms, the process is to split the document into several copies, and every time the user gets a portion of the data, the corresponding fee is paid. Types of mines corresponding to Filecoin’s two major markets are miners and warehousers, among whom miners are primarily responsible for storing data and block packages, while miners are primarily responsible for data query. After the stable operation of the major Filecoin network in the future, the mining operator will be introduced, who is the main responsible for data maintenance.
In the initial release of Filecoin, the request matching mechanism was not implemented in the storage market and retrieval market, but the takeover mechanism was adopted. The three main parts of Filecoin correspond to three processes, namely the stored procedure, retrieval process, packaging and reward process. The following figure shows the simplified process and the income of the miners:
The Filecoin mining process is much more complicated, and the important factor in determining the previous mining profit is efficient storage. Effective storage is a key feature that distinguishes Filecoin from other decentralized storage projects. In Filecoin’s EC consensus, effective storage is similar to interest in PoS, which determines the likelihood that a miner will get the right to fill, that is, the proportion of miners effectively stored in the entire network is proportional to final mining revenue.
It is also possible to obtain higher effective storage under the same hardware conditions by improving the mining algorithm. However, the current increase in the number of benefits that can be achieved by improving the algorithm is still unknown.
It seeks to promote mining using Filecoin Discover
Filecoin announced Filecoin Discover — a step to encourage miners to join the Filecoin network. According to the company, Filecoin Discover is “an ever-growing catalog of numerous petabytes of public data covering literature, science, art, and history.” Miners interested in sharing can choose which data sets they want to store, and receive that data on a drive at a cost. In exchange for storing this verified data, miners will earn additional Filecoin above the regular block rewards for storing data. Includes the current catalog of open source data sets; ENCODE, 1000 Genomes, Project Gutenberg, Berkley Self-driving data, more projects, and datasets are added every day.
Ian Darrow, Head of Operations at Filecoin, commented on the announcement:
“Over 2.5 quintillion bytes of data are created every day. This data includes 294 billion emails, 500 million tweets and 64 billion messages on social media. But it is also climatology reports, disease tracking maps, connected vehicle coordinates and much more. It is extremely important that we maintain data that will serve as the backbone for future research and discovery”.
Miners who choose to participate in Filecoin Discover may receive hard drives pre-loaded with verified data, as well as setup and maintenance instructions, depending on the company. The Filecoin team will also host the Slack (fil-Discover-support) channel where miners can learn more.
Filecoin got its fair share of obstacles along the way. Last month Filecoin announced a further delay before its main network was officially launched — after years of raising funds.
In late July QEBR (OTC: QEBR) announced that it had ceded ownership of two subsidiaries in order to focus all of the company’s resources on building blockchain-based mining operations.
The QEBR technology team previously announced that it has proven its system as a Filecoin node valid with CPU, GPU, bandwidth and storage compatibility that meets all IPFS guidelines. The QEBR test system is connected to the main Filecoin blockchain and the already mined filecoin coin has already been tested.
“The disclosure of Sheen Boom and Jihye will allow our team to focus only on the upcoming global launch of Filecoin. QEBR branch, Shenzhen DZD Digital Technology Ltd. (“ DZD “), has a strong background in blockchain development, extraction Data, data acquisition, data processing, data technology research. We strongly believe Filecoin has the potential to be a leading blockchain-based cryptocurrency and will make every effort to make QEBR an important player when Mainecoin mainnet will be launched soon”.
IPFS and Filecoin
Filecoin and IPFS are complementary protocols for storing and sharing data in a decentralized network. While users are not required to use Filecoin and IPFS together, the two combined are working to resolve major failures in the current web infrastructure.
IPFS
It is an open source protocol that allows users to store and transmit verifiable data with each other. IPFS users insist on data on the network by installing it on their own device, to a third-party cloud service (known as Pinning Services), or through community-oriented systems where a group of individual IPFS users share resources to ensure the content stays live.
The lack of an integrated catalytic mechanism is the challenge Filecoin hopes to solve by allowing users to catalyze long-term distributed storage at competitive prices through the storage contract market, while maintaining the efficiency and flexibility that the IPFS network provides.
Using IPFS
In IPFS, the data is hosted by the required data installation nodes. For data to persist while the user node is offline, users must either rely on their other peers to install their data voluntarily or use a central install service to store data.
Peer-to-peer reliance caching data may be a good thing as one or multiple organizations share common files on an internal network, or where strong social contracts can be used to ensure continued hosting and preservation of content in the long run. Most users in an IPFS network use an installation service.
Using Filecoin
The last option is to install your data in a decentralized storage market, such as Filecoin. In Filecoin’s structure, customers make regular small payments to store data when a certain availability, while miners earn those payments by constantly checking the integrity of this data, storing it, and ensuring its quick recovery. This allows users to motivate Filecoin miners to ensure that their content will be live when it is needed, a distinct advantage of relying only on other network users as required using IPFS alone.
Filecoin, powered by IPFS
It is important to know that Filecoin is built on top of IPFS. Filecoin aims to be a very integrated and seamless storage market that takes advantage of the basic functions provided by IPFS, they are connected to each other, but can be implemented completely independently of each other. Users do not need to interact with Filecoin in order to use IPFS.
Some advantages of sharing Filecoin with IPFS:
Of all the decentralized storage projects, Filecoin is undoubtedly the most interested, and IPFS has been running stably for two years, fully demonstrating the strength of its core protocol.
Filecoin’s ability to obtain market share from traditional central storage depends on end-user experience and storage price. Currently, most Filecoin nodes are posted in the IDC room. Actual deployment and operation costs are not reduced compared to traditional central cloud storage, and the storage process is more complicated.
PoRep and PoSt, which has a large number of proofs of unknown operation, are required to cause the actual storage cost to be so, in the early days of the release of Filecoin. The actual cost of storing data may be higher than the cost of central cloud storage, but the initial storage node may reduce the storage price in order to obtain block rewards, which may result in the actual storage price lower than traditional central cloud storage.
In the long term, Filecoin still needs to take full advantage of its P2P storage, convert storage devices from specialization to civil use, and improve its algorithms to reduce storage costs without affecting user experience. The storage problem is an important problem to be solved in the blockchain field, so a large number of storage projects were presented at the 19th Web3 Summit. IPFS is an important part of Web3 visibility. Its development will affect the development of Web3 to some extent. Likewise, Web3 development somewhat determines the future of IPFS. Filecoin is an IPFS-based storage class project initiated by IPFS. There is no doubt that he is highly expected.
Resources :
  1. https://www.coindesk.com/filecoin-pushes-back-final-testing-phase-announces-calibration-period-for-miners
  2. https://docs.filecoin.io/mine/#types-of-miners https://www.nasdaq.com/articles/inside-the-craze-for-filecoin-crypto-mining-in-china-2020-07-12؟amp
  3. https://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/qebr-streamlines-holdings-to-concentrate-on-filecoin-development-and-mining-301098731.html
  4. https://www.crowdfundinsider.com/2020/05/161200-filecoin-seeks-to-boost-mining-with-filecoin-discove
  5. https://zephyrnet.com/filecoin-seeks-to-boost-mining-with-filecoin-discove
  6. https://docs.filecoin.io/introduction/ipfs-and-filecoin/#filecoin-powered-by-ipfs
submitted by CoinEx_Institution to filecoin [link] [comments]

Reddcoin (RDD) 02/20 Progress Report - Core Wallet v3.1 Evolution & PoSV v2 - Commits & More Commits to v3.1! (Bitcoin Core 0.10, MacOS Catalina, QT Enhanced Speed and Security and more!)

Reddcoin (RDD) Core Dev Team Informal Progress Report, Feb 2020 - As any blockchain or software expert will confirm, the hardest part of making successful progress in blockchain and crypto is invisible to most users. As developers, the Reddcoin Core team relies on internal experts like John Nash, contributors offering their own code improvements to our repos (which we would love to see more of!) and especially upstream commits from experts working on open source projects like Bitcoin itself. We'd like tothank each and everyone who's hard work has contributed to this progress.
As part of Reddcoin's evolution, and in order to include required security fixes, speed improvements that are long overdue, the team has up to this point incorporated the following code commits since our last v3.0.1 public release. In attempting to solve the relatively minor font display issue with MacOS Catalina, we uncovered a complicated interweaving of updates between Reddcoin Core, QT software, MacOS SDK, Bitcoin Core and related libraries and dependencies that mandated we take a holistic approach to both solve the Catalina display problem, but in doing so, prepare a more streamlined overall build and test system, allowing the team to roll out more frequent and more secure updates in the future. And also to include some badly needed fixes in the current version of Core, which we have tentatively labeled Reddcoin Core Wallet v3.1.
Note: As indicated below, v3.1 is NOT YET AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD BY PUBLIC. We wil advise when it is.
The new v3.1 version should be ready for internal QA and build testing by the end of this week, with luck, and will be turned over to the public shortly thereafter once testing has proven no unexpected issues have been introduced. We know the delay has been a bit extended for our ReddHead MacOS Catalina stakers, and we hope to have them all aboard soon. We have moved with all possible speed while attempting to incorproate all the required work, testing, and ensuring security and safety for our ReddHeads.
Which leads us to: PoSV v2 activation and the supermajority on Mainnet at the time of this writing has reached 5625/9000 blocks or 62.5%. We have progressed quite well and without any reported user issues since release, but we need all of the community to participate! This activation, much like the funding mechanisms currently being debated by BCH and others, and employed by DASH, will mean not only a catalyst for Reddcoin but ensure it's future by providing funding for the dev team. As a personal plea from the team, please help us support the PoSV v2 activation by staking your RDD, no matter how large or small your amount of stake.
Every block and every RDD counts, and if you don't know how, we'll teach you! Live chat is fun as well as providing tech support you can trust from devs and community ReddHead members. Join us today in staking and online and collect some RDD "rain" from users and devs alike!
If you're holding Reddcoin and not staking, or you haven't upgraded your v2.x wallet to v3.0.1 (current release), we need you to help achieve consensus and activate PoSV v2! For details, see the pinned message here or our website or medium channel. Upgrade is simple and takes moments; if you're nervous or unsure, we're here to help live in Telegram or Discord, as well as other chat programs. See our website for links.
Look for more updates shortly as our long-anticipated Reddcoin Payment Gateway and Merchant Services API come online with point-of-sale support, as we announce the cross-crypto-project Aussie firefighter fundraiser program, as well as a comprehensive update to our development roadmap and more.
Work has restarted on ReddID and multiple initiatives are underway to begin educating and sharing information about ReddID, what it is, and how to use it, as we approach a releasable ReddID product. We enthusiastically encourage anyone interested in working to bring these efforts to life, whether writers, UX/UI experts, big data analysts, graphic artists, coders, front-end, back-end, AI, DevOps, the Reddcoin Core dev team is growing, and there's more opportunity and work than ever!
Bring your talents to a community and dev team that truly appreciates it, and share the Reddcoin Love!
And now, lots of commits. As v3.1 is not yet quite ready for public release, these commits have not been pushed publicly, but in the interests of sharing progress transparently, and including our ReddHead community in the process, see below for mind-numbing technical detail of work accomplished.
e5c143404 - - 2014-08-07 - Ross Nicoll - Changed LevelDB cursors to use scoped pointers to ensure destruction when going out of scope. *99a7dba2e - - 2014-08-15 - Cory Fields - tests: fix test-runner for osx. Closes ##4708 *8c667f1be - - 2014-08-15 - Cory Fields - build: add funcs.mk to the list of meta-depends *bcc1b2b2f - - 2014-08-15 - Cory Fields - depends: fix shasum on osx < 10.9 *54dac77d1 - - 2014-08-18 - Cory Fields - build: add option for reducing exports (v2) *6fb9611c0 - - 2014-08-16 - randy-waterhouse - build : fix CPPFLAGS for libbitcoin_cli *9958cc923 - - 2014-08-16 - randy-waterhouse - build: Add --with-utils (bitcoin-cli and bitcoin-tx, default=yes). Help string consistency tweaks. Target sanity check fix. *342aa98ea - - 2014-08-07 - Cory Fields - build: fix automake warnings about the use of INCLUDES *46db8ad51 - - 2020-02-18 - John Nash - build: add build.h to the correct target *a24de1e4c - - 2014-11-26 - Pavel Janík - Use complete path to include bitcoin-config.h. *fd8f506e5 - - 2014-08-04 - Wladimir J. van der Laan - qt: Demote ReportInvalidCertificate message to qDebug *f12aaf3b1 - - 2020-02-17 - John Nash - build: QT5 compiled with fPIC require fPIC to be enabled, fPIE is not enough *7a991b37e - - 2014-08-12 - Wladimir J. van der Laan - build: check for sys/prctl.h in the proper way *2cfa63a48 - - 2014-08-11 - Wladimir J. van der Laan - build: Add mention of --disable-wallet to bdb48 error messages *9aa580f04 - - 2014-07-23 - Cory Fields - depends: add shared dependency builder *8853d4645 - - 2014-08-08 - Philip Kaufmann - [Qt] move SubstituteFonts() above ToolTipToRichTextFilter *0c98e21db - - 2014-08-02 - Ross Nicoll - URLs containing a / after the address no longer cause parsing errors. *7baa77731 - - 2014-08-07 - ntrgn - Fixes ignored qt 4.8 codecs path on windows when configuring with --with-qt-libdir *2a3df4617 - - 2014-08-06 - Cory Fields - qt: fix unicode character display on osx when building with 10.7 sdk *71a36303d - - 2014-08-04 - Cory Fields - build: fix race in 'make deploy' for windows *077295498 - - 2014-08-04 - Cory Fields - build: Fix 'make deploy' when binaries haven't been built yet *ffdcc4d7d - - 2014-08-04 - Cory Fields - build: hook up qt translations for static osx packaging *25a7e9c90 - - 2014-08-04 - Cory Fields - build: add --with-qt-translationdir to configure for use with static qt *11cfcef37 - - 2014-08-04 - Cory Fields - build: teach macdeploy the -translations-dir argument, for use with static qt *4c4ae35b1 - - 2014-07-23 - Cory Fields - build: Find the proper xcb/pcre dependencies *942e77dd2 - - 2014-08-06 - Cory Fields - build: silence mingw fpic warning spew *e73e2b834 - - 2014-06-27 - Huang Le - Use async name resolving to improve net thread responsiveness *c88e76e8e - - 2014-07-23 - Cory Fields - build: don't let libtool insert rpath into binaries *18e14e11c - - 2014-08-05 - ntrgn - build: Fix windows configure when using --with-qt-libdir *bb92d65c4 - - 2014-07-31 - Cory Fields - test: don't let the port number exceed the legal range *62b95290a - - 2014-06-18 - Cory Fields - test: redirect comparison tool output to stdout *cefe447e9 - - 2014-07-22 - Cory Fields - gitian: remove unneeded option after last commit *9347402ca - - 2014-07-21 - Cory Fields - build: fix broken boost chrono check on some platforms *c9ed039cf - - 2014-06-03 - Cory Fields - build: fix whitespace in pkg-config variable *3bcc5ad37 - - 2014-06-03 - Cory Fields - build: allow linux and osx to build against static qt5 *01a44ba90 - - 2014-07-17 - Cory Fields - build: silence false errors during make clean *d1fbf7ba2 - - 2014-07-08 - Cory Fields - build: fix win32 static linking after libtool merge *005ae2fa4 - - 2014-07-08 - Cory Fields - build: re-add AM_LDFLAGS where it's overridden *37043076d - - 2014-07-02 - Wladimir J. van der Laan - Fix the Qt5 build after d95ba75 *f3b4bbf40 - - 2014-07-01 - Wladimir J. van der Laan - qt: Change serious messages from qDebug to qWarning *f4706f753 - - 2014-07-01 - Wladimir J. van der Laan - qt: Log messages with type>QtDebugMsg as non-debug *98e85fa1f - - 2014-06-06 - Pieter Wuille - libsecp256k1 integration *5f1f2e226 - - 2020-02-17 - John Nash - Merge branch 'switch_verification_code' into Build *1f30416c9 - - 2014-02-07 - Pieter Wuille - Also switch the (unused) verification code to low-s instead of even-s. *1c093d55e - - 2014-06-06 - Cory Fields - secp256k1: Add build-side changes for libsecp256k1 *7f3114484 - - 2014-06-06 - Cory Fields - secp256k1: add libtool as a dependency *2531f9299 - - 2020-02-17 - John Nash - Move network-time related functions to timedata.cpp/h *d003e4c57 - - 2020-02-16 - John Nash - build: fix build weirdness after 54372482. *7035f5034 - - 2020-02-16 - John Nash - Add ::OUTPUT_SIZE *2a864c4d8 - - 2014-06-09 - Cory Fields - crypto: create a separate lib for crypto functions *03a4e4c70 - - 2014-06-09 - Cory Fields - crypto: explicitly check for byte read/write functions *a78462a2a - - 2014-06-09 - Cory Fields - build: move bitcoin-config.h to its own directory *a885721c4 - - 2014-05-31 - Pieter Wuille - Extend and move all crypto tests to crypto_tests.cpp *5f308f528 - - 2014-05-03 - Pieter Wuille - Move {Read,Write}{LE,BE}{32,64} to common.h and use builtins if possible *0161cc426 - - 2014-05-01 - Pieter Wuille - Add built-in RIPEMD-160 implementation *deefc27c0 - - 2014-04-28 - Pieter Wuille - Move crypto implementations to src/crypto/ *d6a12182b - - 2014-04-28 - Pieter Wuille - Add built-in SHA-1 implementation. *c3c4f9f2e - - 2014-04-27 - Pieter Wuille - Switch miner.cpp to use sha2 instead of OpenSSL. *b6ed6def9 - - 2014-04-28 - Pieter Wuille - Remove getwork() RPC call *0a09c1c60 - - 2014-04-26 - Pieter Wuille - Switch script.cpp and hash.cpp to use sha2.cpp instead of OpenSSL. *8ed091692 - - 2014-04-20 - Pieter Wuille - Add a built-in SHA256/SHA512 implementation. *0c4c99b3f - - 2014-06-21 - Philip Kaufmann - small cleanup in src/compat .h and .cpp *ab1369745 - - 2014-06-13 - Cory Fields - sanity: hook up sanity checks *f598c67e0 - - 2014-06-13 - Cory Fields - sanity: add libc/stdlib sanity checks *b241b3e13 - - 2014-06-13 - Cory Fields - sanity: autoconf check for sys/select.h *cad980a4f - - 2019-07-03 - John Nash - build: Add a top-level forwarding target for src/ objects *f4533ee1c - - 2019-07-03 - John Nash - build: qt: split locale resources. Fixes non-deterministic distcheck *4a0e46e76 - - 2019-06-29 - John Nash - build: fix version dependency *2f61699d9 - - 2019-06-29 - John Nash - build: quit abusing AMCPPFLAGS *99b60ba49 - - 2019-06-29 - John Nash - build: avoid the use of top and abs_ dir paths *c8f673d5d - - 2019-06-29 - John Nash - build: Tidy up file generation output *5318bce57 - - 2019-06-29 - John Nash - build: nuke Makefile.include from orbit *672a25349 - - 2019-06-29 - John Nash - build: add stub makefiles for easier subdir builds *562b7c5a6 - - 2020-02-08 - John Nash - build: delete old Makefile.am's *066120079 - - 2020-02-08 - John Nash - build: Switch to non-recursive make
Whew! No wonder it's taken the dev team a while! :)
TL;DR: Trying to fix MacOS Catalina font display led to requiring all kinds of work to migrate and evolve the Reddcoin Core software with Apple, Bitcoin and QT components. Lots of work done, v3.1 public release soon. Also other exciting things and ReddID back under active dev effort.
submitted by TechAdept to reddCoin [link] [comments]

ROADRUNNER Phone Number ☺+𝟏-8OO,-377,-9182 USA Email Phone Number

ROADRUNNER Phone Number ☺+𝟏-8OO,-377,-9182 USA Email Phone Number

ROADRUNNER Customer Service Phone Number 𝟏-8OO,-377,-9182 mail care Call/Contact Tech Support 800 telephone Representative, Help Desk Helpline center Email & webmail address, Live Chat support agent official site for bill payment

ROADRUNNER customer service Phone number, email address and full contact us now details are contained in this post.



ROADRUNNER Customer Care Number

ROADRUNNER is an American multinational telecommunications and mass media company, incorporated on October 5, 19883 having its headquarters in Dallas, Texas and the United States. This conglomerate holding company (ROADRUNNER) has a wide range of products including Satellite television, Digital television, a fixed line telephone, Mobile phone, IPTV, OTT Services, Broadband, Network security and Home Security. It has two major divisions: At & T Communications and AT & T International. You might want to learn more on Wikipedia.

ROADRUNNER operates through different four divisions as Business Solutions, Entertainment Group, Consumer Mobility and International. These segments generate the various subsidiaries of ROADRUNNER Inc.

• ROADRUNNER Digital Life

• ROADRUNNER Dish

• ROADRUNNER Internet

• ROADRUNNER Corporation

• ROADRUNNER Mobility

• ROADRUNNER Originals

• ROADRUNNER Labs

• ROADRUNNER U-verse

• ROADRUNNER GoPhone

• ROADRUNNER SportsNet

• ROADRUNNER Mexico

• Roadrunner

• Cricket Wireless

• Otter Media

• DirecTV

• ROADRUNNER Mobility

• SKY Brasil Services Ltda.

Major Services of ROADRUNNER: this world’s largest telecommunications company offers numerous great services, some of which are highlighted below:

Wireless Communications

Digital entertainment

Internet interactive game playing

Rendering internet services

Digital video services

Local and long distance telephone services

Sales of telecommunications equipment

Home and office network management

Wholesale of services and products

Mobile share plans

Equipment instalment programs: allowing users to upgrade their handset to a greater version.

Roaming network services

Creating internal data networks

High-speed internet usage

External data network assessment

Transferring of data other users or multiple lines

Providing business voice applications

Provides complex global data networks

Enables inter-office electronic communications

Support for network designing

Network management of varying scales

Enabling database applications: e-mail, order entry systems, employees directories and human resources transactions

Intrastate, interstate and international wholesale networking capacity to other service providers

Voice and data services

Availability of postpaid or prepaid pricing plans

It offers consulting and advertising services

Allows unused data plans to be rolled over to the next month

Wi-Fi services

Supports for travelling abroad

And other lots of great services offered by its various services.

ROADRUNNER Customer Service Full Contact Details

Now, if you are interested in utilizing any of the ROADRUNNER goods and services stated above, you will need to get more details of its products through the ROADRUNNER customer service agents or their website. Or are you a customer already with some issues regarding making payments, usage checking, getting your balance, upgrading your wireless devices, or having any other queries, complaints and suggestions? Then you will have to make use of our listed contacts details of the ROADRUNNER customer service support. Look through carefully so that you will know which of the right number to call for your specific requirement.

ROADRUNNER Subsidiaries Telephone Numbers

• ROADRUNNER Digital Life: +𝟏-𝟖𝟎𝟎-𝟑𝟕𝟕-𝟵𝟏𝟴𝟐

• ROADRUNNER Dish: +𝟏-𝟖𝟎𝟎-𝟑𝟕𝟕-𝟵𝟏𝟴𝟐

• ROADRUNNER Internet: +𝟏-𝟖𝟎𝟎-𝟑𝟕𝟕-𝟵𝟏𝟴𝟐

• ROADRUNNER U-verse: +𝟏8𝟎𝟎-377-9182

• ROADRUNNER GoPhone: +𝟏-𝟖𝟎𝟎-𝟑𝟕𝟕-𝟵𝟏𝟴𝟐

• ROADRUNNER HomePhones: 𝟏-𝟖𝟎𝟎-𝟑𝟕𝟕-𝟵𝟏𝟴𝟐

• Cricket Wireless: 𝟏-𝟖𝟎𝟎-𝟑𝟕𝟕-𝟵𝟏𝟴𝟐

• DirecTV: 𝟏-𝟖𝟎𝟎-𝟑𝟕𝟕-𝟵𝟏𝟴𝟐

ROADRUNNER Customer Support Phone Numbers.

You can also access their other ROADRUNNER services by using the stipulated customer care phone numbers below:

• Web Conferencing: 𝟏-𝟖𝟎𝟎-𝟑𝟕𝟕-𝟵𝟏𝟴𝟐

• Audio Conferencing: 𝟏-𝟖𝟎𝟎-𝟑𝟕𝟕-𝟵𝟏𝟴𝟐

• Host Account Administration: 𝟏-𝟖𝟎𝟎-𝟑𝟕𝟕-𝟵𝟏𝟴𝟐

• Billing & Invoice Inquiries: 𝟏-𝟖𝟎𝟎-𝟑𝟕𝟕-𝟵𝟏𝟴𝟐

• ROADRUNNER Prepaid: 𝟏-𝟖𝟎𝟎-𝟑𝟕𝟕-𝟵𝟏𝟴𝟐

• Travelling abroad Support: 𝟏-𝟖𝟎𝟎-𝟑𝟕𝟕-𝟵𝟏𝟴𝟐

• Disability resources: 𝟏-𝟖𝟎𝟎-𝟑𝟕𝟕-𝟵𝟏𝟴𝟐

Call ROADRUNNER customer service 𝟏-𝟖𝟎𝟎-𝟑𝟕𝟕-𝟵𝟏𝟴𝟐 number for Internet usage support, Digital Phone support, fixing any technical issues and general support.

ROADRUNNER Tech Support Phone Number ROADRUNNER phone Number Feedback, and Suggestions

ROADRUNNER Tech Support Phone Number 😂 😂 😂 😂

To recover a lost password, you can contact Windows Live ROADRUNNER support using a different form. For general support, follow these instructions.

Check Windows Live ROADRUNNER's status for current issues.

Toll free may already be aware of a problem with Windows Live ROADRUNNER and working on a resolution.

Go to the Windows Live ROADRUNNER forum on Toll free Answers.

Click Sign in in the top right corner if you are not yet signed into Toll free Answers.

If you are not logged in to your Windows Live ROADRUNNER account:

Enter your Windows Live ROADRUNNER address under Windows Live ID:.

Type your Windows Live ROADRUNNER password under Password:.

Click Sign in.

If you cannot sign in to your Windows Live ROADRUNNER account, you can try to recover your password or create a new, temporary, Windows Live account.

If you have not created a Toll free Answers profile yet:

Enter the name you want to appear with your posts in the Windows Live ROADRUNNER forum under Display Name:.

Type your Windows Live ROADRUNNER address (or another address where you want to receive optional notifications of replies to your question) under Email address:.

Make sure I accept the Answers Code of Conduct is checked after you have read and accepted the code.

Click Sign Up.

Click Ask a question.

Type the headline of your question — ideally a short summary — under Post your question to the community.

Click Ask.

Look under Before you post your question... tab to see potentially helpful answers to similar questions.

Fill in your problem and question under Details:.

Include as much information as possible. If something comes to mind (a change at your internet service provider's network infrastructure, for example, or a web site that prompted you to install a program) and you think it must be insignificant, do list it.

Make sure ROADRUNNER, Messenger & SkyDrive is selected under Forum.

Now make sure ROADRUNNER is selected under Product.

Pick the most appropriate category under Topic.

Choose Yes Mobile under Mobile version? if your problem is with Windows Live ROADRUNNER on the road; otherwise, make sure Not Mobile is selected.

Leave Notify me when someone responds to this question checked to receive notifications at the email address you entered earlier.

ROADRUNNER is an encrypted proprietary web-based email service offering PGP-encrypted e-mail and vanity domain service. ROADRUNNER uses OpenPGP standards. If public encryption keys are available to both recipient and sender, ROADRUNNER can convey authenticated, encrypted messages in both directions-ROADRUNNER mail has been launched for fulfilling requirement of checking the mails through any device. It has made easy for the users to access the account from even a simple computer. With this mail account you can simply “Sign-In” in your account by putting the email address and the password. Once you “Sign In” you can check the activity of your mail account. You can compose, read the incoming mail and also download the large file attachments.

Majority of people has been registered with ROADRUNNER premium email account because it is completely different from other mail accounts with number of favorable qualities available in it. It is currently considered as one of the leading webmail application that has got the remarkable reputation among the users and it’s effectual ROADRUNNER email customer support is always available for those users who generally face issues while handling accounts. To update them the customer carenical team attends sessions which over different parts require for the effective support.

Why Contact ROADRUNNER 24/7 Support Number:Being a part of ROADRUNNER and ROADRUNNER services it offers a easy handling mailing option but there are also many customer carenical glitches occurs with users that you may face as well. For these issues you can contact customer carenical support to get help and you can find plenty of them in the internet. Customer carenical support is available 24x7 so that you can contact them according to your convenience.

ROADRUNNER enterprise Email Account Troubleshooting sources:ROADRUNNER password not workingNew account sign up assistanceControlling spam, junk and phishing mailsConfigure mail account intovariousmailingservicesanddIssues in sending/receiving mail

Let’s have some discussion on the ROADRUNNER premium mail issues solved by the team of ROADRUNNER online phone support-

Setting the ROADRUNNER account on Android

From your “Application” menu select the icon of Email

Enter the name and password and now “Manual setup” should be selected

“POP3”should be selected now

Directly you would access the “Incoming server settings”

The email address should be ended with u/Bitcoin.net

Do the change in the incoming server box so, that it will display “pop.mail

Tap the option for “Next”

Go and now you should click on “Outgoing server settings”

Go and do the selection of “Edit” for outgoing server settings that will show “smtp.mail

“Next” should be selected now

You can access to the page where you would be assign with “Display/Account names

Emails would come in few minutes so, you should wait

If the process is taking too long to execute then you can contact ROADRUNNER internet support

Change the password of ROADRUNNER desktop mail account

First you should go to the page of ROADRUNNER as you know that ROADRUNNER online account has been merged with ROADRUNNER

Tap on the icon of “Mail” that is at the upper right side of the screen

Do the “Log In” process with your ROADRUNNER email address and password or you can select the button by selecting the “Forget password”

When your “Sign In” process complete “ROADRUNNER account info” should be selected

Now “Manage password and security” should be selected

Now access to the ROADRUNNER online account management

Once entering the email address and password you would get directed to the password reset page

Set your password and save the changes made by you

During this process if your internet connection becomes slow then contact the ROADRUNNER WiFi customer serviceROADRUNNER email customer service

The error that generally comes while handling the account needs to remove any time stretch so, that none of the bugs can affect the email account further. The customer service has been designed and introduced to give immediate relief to the users. If you are one of the users who currently facing the bugs then you can trust the customer service team of Bitcoin. The support team is ready to be your companion.
submitted by Roadrunner017 to u/Roadrunner017 [link] [comments]

Windows 10 File and Folder Management - YouTube [WHMCS] Changing Admin Directory  DomainRacer 2019 How to Mine Bitcoins Using Your Own Computer - YouTube How to change Outlook Data Files to new location (new ... How To Quickly: Change A File's

The first step is finding the default data directory. Mac, Windows, and Linux version of Bitcoin Core each store data in a different location. The procedure described here will use a graphical file browser to find it. On Windows 7, begin by clicking on the Windows menu. Then click your username from the right-hand menu. Windows Explorer should show a folder containing other folders such as ... Bitcoin Core normally puts all of its data into one data directory, but oftentimes it is useful to adjust things so that certain of these files go elsewhere.. If your data directory is on a magnetic disk: Moving chainstate for improved speed. Bitcoin Core's overall speed is significantly affected by the random-access speed of the contents of the chainstate directory; if your data directory is ... Copy the Bitcoin Data Directory . Having found the default data directory, we can now copy it. Be sure that Bitcoin Core has been shut down and is no longer running. The software occasionally takes a minute or two to completely exit. Begin by renaming the Bitcoin Core data directory. Use the name bitcoin-backup. Don’t move the renamed folder ... Change default data directory from 'bitcoin' to 'bitcoin-abc' #32. cryptoapi opened this issue Jul 27, 2017 · 5 comments Comments. Copy link Quote reply cryptoapi commented Jul 27, 2017 • edited or to something else. Copy link Quote reply Author cryptoapi commented Jul 27, 2017. You can change default directories in function boost::filesystem::path GetDefaultDataDir(){..} https://github.com ... Start Bitcoin, now you will see all the files are created in the new data directory. Linux. By default Bitcoin will put its data here: ~/.bitcoin/ You need to do a "ls -a" to see directories that start with a dot. If that's not it, you can do a search like this: find / -name wallet.dat -print 2>/dev/null Mac. By default Bitcoin will put its ...

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Windows 10 File and Folder Management - YouTube

These default settings are no good! Here is what to change. More Top Lists https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLFr3c472Vstw-sCvBrlRTelW3ULg1-w3n Subscri... Step 2: Telling WHMCS of the new admin directory: 1. While still in your file manager & in the WHMCS directory open up “Configuration.php” 2. Change the “ custom_admin_path “= “admin ... zbrush 2018 update video https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nGG3kXqABUA YOU CAN STILL USE IT ON OTHER FOLDERS, SUCH AS ZPROJECTS, OR ANY OTHER NON-ZBRUSH PROGRA... Start trading Bitcoin and cryptocurrency here: http://bit.ly/2Vptr2X IMPORTANT!! This method only illustrates how mining works. You will not make any money f... This Nugget is a critical video from the course Windows 10 End-User Essentials at CBT Nuggets. This course provides a Hands On Lab environment to teach learn...

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